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Herbal Mixes and Teas

Atract Love Spell Mix

Our Attract Love spell mix is intended to bring love into your life, or help the one that you desire fall for you. Use on charcoal to burn, add to your bath, potpourrie or mojo bag.

$27.99

Banishing Spell Mix

A mix created of carefully chosen herbs, the Banishing spell mix from AzureGreen is intended to empower you banishing rituals and help you get rid of negative energies, spirits, and influences.

$14.99

Empowerment Spell Mix

Empower your magick and improve all of your rituals and spells with the Empowerment herbal spell mix, which has been created specifically with herbs that lend power to magic.

$22.99

Flea Prevention for Pets

Herbal powder to add to pet's food sparingly, like a spice. It changes the animal's scent to discourage biting insects. Contains: Brewer's Yeast, Garlic and Fennel.

$22.99

Four Winds Herbal Smoking Blend

A non-tobacco ritual blend, Four Winds Smoking Blend is created using Coltsfoot, Mullein, Mugwort in a blend especially crafted for wisdom, visions, protection, courage, psychic strength, and astral travel. Blend includes: Mullen, Coltsfoot and Mugwort

$24.99

Healing and Spell Mix

AzureGreen's Healing spell mix has been chosen from the finest herbs to help empower your healing rituals, offering spiritual mending, emotional healing, and a boost to modern medicine.

$16.99

Purification Spell Mix

This blend of herbs from AzureGreen is specifically intended to lend power to your spells and rituals, particularly those that involve consecration and purification.

$12.99

Releasing Spell Mix

Let go of bad habits, addictions, negative relationships and influences with the aid of our Releasing spell mix.

$19.99

Smoker's Aid

Smoker's Aid is a non-tobacco ritual blend created to help reduce coughing, repair lung tissue, and help with weight control. Blend includes: Dandelion, Nettle, Mullen, Coltsfoot, Damiana and Lobelia.

$26.99

Wishing Spell Mix

Blended of carefully chosen herbs chosen for their ability to empower your Wish magick, this spell mix is a fantastic way to help your wishes come true with a little touch of magic.

$15.99

   

 

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1618 Gold

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1618 Gold 1oz Herb Pkt

 

1oz $5.99

$72.99

$5.95

 

 

Acai Berry Powder ~

Found within the Brazilian Amazon, from trees that grow along the Amazon River, Acai berry, or Euterpe oleracea, are a popular and seedy, grape-like fruit that have been used for quite some time among the native people of Brazil. More recently, Acai berries have come to the attention of the general public within a hotly debated discussion over its numerous qualities, as experts, herbalists, and dietitians have widely made claims that it can increase personal energy while improving sleep, improve digestion, improve circulation and heart health, help achieve healthier skin, and even help prevent certain forms of cancer. All in all, these claims make it quite the cure-all.

Common in juices, pills, and powder form, the truth behind Acai Berry is still up to debate. It does however contain Omega 6 and Omega 9 fatty acids, which have been proven to help reduce the risk of some varieties of cancer. It is also said to contain beta sitosterol, which is said to promote urinary and prostate health, and may possibly be useful in the treatment of certain kinds of cancer. Further study has also revealed numerous amino acids which are generally believed to be good for improving muscle regeneration, endurance, strength, and development, which can be quite useful in working out and helping the muscles of the heart. Generally, these known qualities leave Acai Berry, in its various forms, as a well received supplement.

 

1oz $3.99

$37.99

$3.95

 

 

Acerola Berry Powder ~

There had been very little study upon the North American Acerola Berry (Malpighia Glabra) until relatively recent years. It was then that it was discovered that the berry contained a substantial amount of vitamin. Indeed, it has been shown that Acerola Berries contain 32% more vitamin C than oranges, and for a time apple juice mixed with small amounts of Acerola Berry extract was being utilized as a gentler Vitamin C supplement for young children. It has also been shown that Acerola Berry contains a high concentration of antioxidants, which are believed to help prevent and relieve damage sustained by the body at a cellular level.

Because of these qualities, Acerola Berry Extract (sometimes provided in a powder form), is often prescribed by herbalists as a way to boost the immune system. Some studies have also shown that they might be combined with soy to combat high cholesterol, while studies for diabetics have revealed that it may help decrease blood sugar levels. Aceroal Berry can also be found in use within the cosmetics industry, where it is believed to help prevent skin discoloration.

 

2oz $4.99

$28.99

$2.95

 

Activated Charcoal Powder ~

Activated Charcoal is derived from processing charcoal in a manner that leaves it extremely porous. This results in each granule of activated charcoal possessing an extremely large surface area. Indeed, as typically determined through the measurement of nitrogen gas absorption, a single gram of activated carbon has a surface area greater than 500 square meters. That translates into a single gram of activated charcoal powder having a surface area roughly one tenth the size of a football field. This makes activated charcoal quite absorbent. As a result it is commonly used in spill cleanup, drinking water filtration, and air purification.

Medically, activated charcoal is used to treat poisoning and overdoses. In hospitals it is often used in favor of induced vomiting and stomach pumping techniques. Some also view it as a potentially helpful in treating various other forms of gastric distress, such as acid reflux. Topically, it is sometimes used for treating insect bites such as bee and scorpion stings.

 

2oz $3.95

$16.95

$2.95

Agrimony ~

Agrimony, or Agrimonia eupatoria, is an herb known widely throughout folklore by many names, including Church Steeples, Cockeburr, Sticklewort, Philantopos, Garclive, and Egrimayne, all depending on the culture that is referring to it and the time period in which it is discussed. Throughout history it has been given a reputation as possessing magickal and medicinal properties, with references within a publication of the London Materia Medica, and numerous other sources, and it has been widely referred to in ages past as an herb known for treating wounds and aiding in blood clotting, as well as being a potent component in treating snake bites, warts, and a variety of stomach and digestion issues. Perhaps most notably, it is an ingredient in the famous "arquebusade water," which was used to treat wounds inflicted by an arquebus, or hand-gun. In mystical terms, it is also widely known for its ability to sedate, and even put men to sleep. In this circumstance it is used as a ritual component to a spell, and as has been found in prose in old English manuscripts that suggests that placing it under a pillow would leave someone sleeping until it was removed. Other spiritual and ritual uses found in folklore generally involving using it as an aid for healing, internally and externally, and in the expulsion of spirits, or exorcism.

In more modern holistic use, it is known as an aid in curing jaundice and liver problems, as well as aiding in digestion. Other uses include aiding in controlling and healing skin eruptions and irritations such as pimples and hives and athlete's foot. It has also been known for soothing fevers, colds, and diarrhea. Most commonly, perhaps, it is known for being an astringent that makes a good mouthwash or gargle ingredient.

 

2oz $2.95

$9.99

$1.95

 

Alfalfa Leaf, cut ~

Medicago Sativa, or Alfalfa Leaf, somewhat resembles clover, with clusters of small purple flowers, and is quite a hearty plant, resilient to droughts and frequently relied upon as a source of food for cattle. Indeed, it is one of the highest yielding harvest plants, frequently utilized in hay fields. In human consumption, it is most often used in salads and sandwiches. The tender shoots are also often eaten, serving as a nutritious leafy vegetable. Traditionally, Alfalfa has been found in Chinese medicine as an aid in problems that involve the digestive track as well as the kidneys. Similarly, Hindu Ayrvedic physicians have utilized Alfalfa leaves in treating poor digestion, as well as using the plant to create a poultice for boils. They had also thought of it as a potent aid in treating arthritis and water retention. More commonly these days it is viewed as a dietery supplement, as which it is most frequently taken as a tablet, powder, or tea.

In modern holistic medicine, Alfalfa leaf has been suggested as a supplement for anemia and diabetes, and has also been used to aid in stimulating appetite and weight gain. It is also sometimes used in treating indigestion and bladder problems, as a diuretic. Othrwise it is said to help with increasing lactation and soothing the symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS).

 

2oz $4.95

$28.99

$2.95

Aloe Vera Powder ~

Used medicinally for thousands of years, Aloe Vera is often regarded within many cultures as a sacred plant. Indeed, in some it is regarded as a plant that offers protection against evil influence and power. Among Christians it is often revered as well for the fact that it is spoken of as being involved in the preservation of the Body of Jesus Christ when he was taken from the cross. It is believed that this Hebrew practice was learned from the ancient Egyptians, who's priests would use it in medicine, prayer, and embalming practices. Further east, in Paxistan, Aloe Vera is also known as Quargandal and is used within Ayurvedic medicine.

In modern herbal documentation, Aloe is still highly venerated for its ability to treat wounds and burns, and aid the digestive system both as a laxative and a healing aid for the digestive system. In its powder form it is often used within soaps, lotions, gels and other water-based formulas, or otherwise be used as an aid in its traditional methods when mixed with water.

 

2oz $3.95

$21.95

$2.95

Angelica, cut ~

Angelica, possessing the latin name of Angelica archangelica, is also known under the common names of Garden Angelica, or the Root of the Holy Ghost and its virtues have long been praised in folklore, dating back into ages of great antiquity. It was used during times of plague to protect against contagion and illness, and was used as an aid in purifying blood and was described by some as a "cure for every conceivable malady," though it was chiefly used against poison, infections, and the spread of the plague. Angelica also came to be heavily associated with Angels and divinity, perhaps in part because it tends to bloom around the same time of the day of Michael the Archangel, casting it into a holy light. In this view, it was frequently used to keep evil spirits away and protect against curses, evil spells, and cruel enchantments.

More frequently these days, it is used as a remedy for colds, coughs, rheumatism, and diseases of the urinary track, and some would worn those with diabetes away from it as it possesses a high sugar content. Though it is widely known for these properties, it is more commonly utilized as an expectorant for coughs and a diaphoretic for fevers. Slipping away from holistic medicine, it is perhaps most widely known for its use in flavoring liqueurs, jams, and other such things.

 

2oz $3.95

$20.95

$2.95

Anise, Star ~

The eastern cousin to the western spice, Anise, Anise Star can also be heard commonly referred to as Illicium verum, star aniseed, badian, chinse star anise, and badiana. The fruit of a small tree that originated in Vietnam and China, it is now produced almost exclusively in China. Not to be confused with Japanese Star Anise, which is often used to make incense, Chinese Star Anise (or simply Anise Star), has long been held in Traditional Chinese Medicine as a potent aid in soothing and curing long-lingering colds , as well for its use in soothing flatulence, helping with digestion, and aiding with illness associated with the urinary track, such as kidney stones. To this end, the fruit was sometimes chewed after dinner in china both as an aid for bad breath as well as to aid in digestion as described above.

More modern uses for this wonderful, star-shaped fruit have adhered quite closely to the uses known to older Chinese medicine. Today, the seeds are still chewed after a meal to aid with digestion, and it has spread in use to cooking, and is known as a common ingredient in Chinese, Indian, Malay-Indonesian, and Vietnamese dishes. It is also widely used to treat colds and similar illnesses, and is actually used to produce a key ingredient for a well known, modern cold medicine.

 

2oz $4.95

$30.95

$2.95

Arabic Gum powder ~

Arabic Gum, or as it is also called, Acacia senegal, Gum Anacia, Chaar gund, or char goond, has seen continuous use for centuries. A natural gum made from the hardened sap taken from two species of the acacia tree, it is often reduced or powdered or otherwise diluted for the many uses it provides. Historically cultivated in Arabia, Africa, and West Asia, it was written of by Herodotus as a tool in Egyptian Ebalming as well as by Abu ayd Humayn ibn Ishan al-Ibadi,a famed Arabic physician who described it as an ingredient in poultices or eye compresses. In medieval times it widely saw use in the production of religious texts, providing a key component to the vibrant colors found within illuminated manuscripts as well as, in some cases, a key mix in a blend that allowed gold to be applied by a thin brush in a manner nearly identical to ink. This made it a key component in many occult manuscripts, in helping to maintain the consistency of ink used to inscribe holy seals and words of power, and an such is often viewed as a powerful tool for purification.

Today we find it commonly in small markets throughout the world, particularly in Africa, where it is sold to soothe sore throats and aid the treatment of stomach and intestinal disorders. It has also been said to aid in treating eye problems, combating hemorrhages, and even help in treating the common cold. Otherwise, we can find it as an ingredient in everything from the adhesive in envelopes and stamps to an ingredient in soda and chewing gum.

 

2oz $3.95

$23.95

$2.95

Arnica, Whole ~

Also known as Leapards Bane or Arnica montana, this plant which somewhat resembles a sunflower, and indeed belongs to the same family of plants, Arnica has seen use for ages in an assortment of medical uses. Europeans and Native Americans have used Arnica, to soothe muscle aches, reduce inflammation, and heal wounds since the 1500s. It was commonly the first treatment applied for sprains and bruises and other such injuries, where it helped and sped up the healing process. It has also seen a great deal of use in treating the swelling around insect bites as well as the swelling from fractures, and has also been known to aid in treating Chilblains.

In more modern use, it is frequently utilized in much the same manner, providing relief to injuries, particularly those that are the result of blunt trauma, such as falls, contusions and other such wounds. It has been said to be of use I preventing and treating shock, hemorrhages, and thromboses as well, and help slow bleeding. Modern study has also found that internal use should be strictly avoided as overdose can result in serious medical conditions.

 

1oz $3.95

$33.95

$3.95

Artichoke Leaf Powder ~

Artichoke leaf, or Cynara scolymus, has been used for centuries, with the plant being one of the world's oldest used plants, both medicinally and as a vegetable. Examples of ancient writings and depictions included images of the Artichoke, and the Romans would use the leaf as a digestive aid. In modern practice, the leaf can even be found in use in the creation of a medicinal extract.

Herbalists have not strayed far from the ancient uses of the leaf. Of old, it was used for treating digestive matters and was believed to stimulate the gallbladder. Study has shown that it is in fact good for this, and is useful in treating heart burn, irritable bowel syndrome, and gastritis. Studies are also exploring its use in treating high cholesterol.

 

100gms $12.95

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Asafoetida, Compounded

Used for cooking in some cultures, Asofoetida is perhaps most famous for its potent smell, somewhat reminiscent of garlic or leeks. In spiritual practice, it is commonly used in rituals of exorcism or protection. Use it to help chase away evil spirits and powers, or keep them from reaching yourself and those you love. This is a 100 gram packet of Compounded Asafoetida Gum.

 

2oz $3.95

$24.95

$2.95

Ashwagandha Root Powder ~

One of the best known herbs used within Ayurvedic medicine, Ashwagandha Root (also known as Withania somnifera, Indian Ginseng and Winter Cherry) is rapidly growing in popularity within western herbalism as somewhat of a miracle herb. Its many curative properties are well known Eastern culture however. Within the Indian Ayurvedic traditions, Aswagandha is perhaps most frequently prescribed for its ability to help those who take it maintain physical efforts and to otherwise help the body adapt to the stresses that it experiences. This means that it is widely used for everything from chronic fatigue and bone weakness to muscle weakness and memory loss.

Though the scientific community generally seeks to explore Ashwagandha Root in further depth to verify its use in all of these matters, many herbalists favor it. It has exhibited some use as an anti-inflammatory, and also demonstrates some ability to help boost the immune system and fight off infection. Ashwagandha root is also very commonly used in treatment of stress-related disorders, such as some varieties of Arthritis, hypertension, and other such illness that can be exacerbated by stress. Some within the scientific communities are also exploring it for its anti-tumor qualities. It is advised to avoid use if pregnant.

 

2oz $3.95

$21.95

$2.95

Astralagus Root Powder ~

Astragalus Root or Huang Qi (Latin Name: Astragalus mebranaceus) is perhaps most widely recognized as an herb within Traditional Chinese Medicine used to help enhance the body's energy, or Qi. The body's energy is often a focus for this holistic medical practice, with assorted methods intended to aid in redirecting the body's energies to proper routes, balancing energies, and generally seeking internal harmony. With this purpose in mind, Traditional Chinese Medicine frequently utilized Astragalus Root to help speed up the healing process, and even to help treat diabetes.

Astragalus Root has also emerged within Western practices and is being explored scientifically. In Western herbalism it is frequently ingested as a part of a soup or tea to enhance metabolism and digestion. It has also been explored as a tonic for strengthening the immune system or in various methods intended to help heal wounds. Scientific exploration as demonstrated that Astragalus Root does contain various biologically active chemicals that might leave it able to help reduce the severity of atopic dermatitis and asthma, though further clinical testing was required.

 

1oz $3.95

$42.95

$3.95

Bacopa Monnnieri Powder ~

Also known as Water Hyssop or Brahmi, Bacopa Mennieri is a flowering herb that typically grows within warm marshlands and shorelines. It is perhaps most widely known in India and within Ayurvedic medicinal traditions. Within India it is not only used in the consecration of newborn babies in a ritual intended to open the gateways to knowledge to the infant, but s also used in Ayurveda to treate epilepsy, asthma and a number of disorders that result in anxiety.

As is common, these practices have spilled over to Western herbalism and are being actively explored by the scientific community. Though how exactly it functions remains largely a mystery, Bacopa Mennieri has displayed some ability to help improve anxiety, depression, and memory loss. Indeed it has shown that those treated with the herb often have a better retention of knowledge and can often cope better with stressful situation.

 

2oz $2.95

$15.95

$1.95

Balsam Fir Needles ~

Native to North America, the Balsam fir, or Abies cilicica is an iconic image within many of the forests of the northern regions, as well as extended portions of Appalachia. The wood of the tree has long been used for the production of paper, and resins derived from the tree have actually been used to create turpentine, and even glue, and has been used for making glasses, the components of optical components, as well as the preparations for the permanent mounts of microscopes. The oils derived have also been approved by the Environmental Protection Agency as a non toxic repellant for rodents, perhaps making the popular use of the tree as a Christmas Tree even more appealing. Within magickal applications, these needles can be used to represent the element of earth, functioning as a powerful connection for to the forest and the earth for your ritual magick.

In folk medicine and lore, the needles have been used to derive a popular remedy for colds, often being used as an expectorant to help with coughing symptoms or even as a soothing aid for stuffed up sinuses. Some herbalists also prescribe the needles for their soothing fragrance which can, while easing nervous tension, be somewhat revitalizing and invigorating.

 

2oz $3.95

$21.95

$1.95

Barberry, cut ~

Known under names ranging from Berberis Vulgaris and Mountain Grape to Holy Thorn, Barberry has been known to possess medicinal qualities for well over 2500 years. In Indian folk lore it is mentioned as a potent treatment for diarrhea, the reduction of fevers and the improvement of appetite. It is also believed to aid in relieving upset stomachs while promoting vigor and well-being. Not all of the properties it was said to possess were benign however. Some farmers used to believe that any wheat planted within a few hundred yards of a barberry plant would develop rust or mildew. This was perhaps contributed to by the fact that birds, horses, and swine seem to avoid the plant due to the acidity of its fruit. Eventually, however, this belief was overcome and Barberry became applied to a wide variety of uses, including the making of jellies, garnishes, and even wool dye.

Today it is generally uses as medicine in Iran, particularly in treating gallbladder diseases and heartburn. Bayberry also often sees use in treating hypertension, tachycardia, and epilepsy. Some studies have found however that it should not be utilized by pregnant women, as it can, in some cases, induce uterine contractions.

 

2oz $3.95

$22.95

$2.95

Barley Grass Powder ~

Most commonly known simply as Barley, Barley Grass is one of the most ancient crops known to man. Indeed, archeological evidence shows that it may have been used in the creation of the first drink beer-type drink during the Neolithic period, and it was a staple as beer and grain in Ancient Egypt. Biblically, it was used to define the fertility of the promised land of Canaan, and within the lore of the ancient Greeks it was referred to in a Homeric Hymn to Demeter. Some speculate that the very name Demeter may actually translate into "Barley Mother."

Modern herbalists value Barley Grass, or Hordeum vulgare, for its ability to lower cholesterol. It is also used topically for treating acne, ulcers, and other skin disorders. It is also known to possess some antioxidant qualities and in some studies it is being explored for its evident ability to help protect the cells within human tissues from carcinogens. Further study needs to be conducted however for any such claims to be proved conclusively accurate.

 

2oz $2.95

$14.95

$1.95

Bay Leaves, whole ~

Bay leaves, from the plant known in Latin as Laurus nobilis, are derived from a plant that is quite favored as a shrub for hedges and topiary sculpture. They are also widely known throughout the world as a flavoring agent for a wide variety of culinary crafts, where they are frequently used to wrap other spices and then removed from the dish in which they are used; the leaves are sharp and unpleasant to eat when left in a dish. They are also famous in myth and legend as the laurels worn by the glorious victors of Roman and Greek myth and legend. Some also hold that within magical traditions they are quite useful in spells of wisdom, clairvoyance, protection and healing.

Herbalists and the crafters of oils most frequently use bay leaves to help create essential oils that have somewhat of a spicy aroma. They're also occasionally used to help keep linens fresh, adding their aroma and preventing insect infestation. Some also believe that they are useful in treating headaches, inflammation, infections, and digestive issues.


2oz $3.95

$18.95

$2.95

Bearberry (Uva-Ursi), Whole ~

Also known as Uva-Ursi or kinnikinnick, with its full Latin name being Arctostaphylo uva-ursi, and also found under the name of Clasius, Bearberry has been an herb well-known for its medicinal uses as far back as the 13th century. Marco Polo even spoke of it, reporting that the Chinese were using it as a diuretic to treat kidney and urinary problems. Native Americans were also known to use Bearberry with tobacco and other herbs in religious ceremonies. In this circumstance it was utilized as a smudge or smoked in a pipe, with the smoke of the burned herbs carrying the smoker's prayers. Elsewhere, the Cheyenne were also said to have found use for it in treating back sprains, while other tribes found that it was of benefit when applied to sores. European settlers often used it as well, seeking it as a treatment for diseases of the urinary system.

Bearberry is still frequently looked to in modern holistic medicine for many of these same purposes that were known of old. Most commonly it is now used in treating diseases of the bladder, particularly those involving inflammation. Some herbalists also consider it of use as a weight-loss aid, and a great aid in helping infections heal.

 

2oz $3.95

$19.95

$2.95

Bee Pollen Granules ~

Used for thousands of years throughout the world, from Ancient Egypt and Greece to Ancient China to modern day, Bee Pollen Granules are yet another product created by the amazing Honey Bee. Mingling flower pollen with nectar and enzymes secreted by the bees, Bee Pollen is collected from the fuzzy back legs of a bee, usually with a special tool that brushes it from them as they enter a hive. The result is Bee Pollen Granules, which have been recommended medically since the ancients. Hippocrates of the Greeks, often considered the father of modern medicine, even recommended their use to improve energy and physical endurance.

Modern herbalists still recommend Bee Pollen for the same purposes. It is generally prescribed to increase strength, staminia and memory. Some also explore the possibility that Bee Pollen granules may aid in treating respiratory infections and difficulties such as asthma or allergies such as Hay Fever. A lack of scientific study leaves this suggestion somewhat uncertain. Some also caution the use of Bee Pollen granules if you possess an allergy to bee stings.

 

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$29.95

Beeswax

Beeswax is a natural wax secreted by honey bees. These marvelous little creatures actually produce it by converting the sugars within honey into the waxy substance they use to create the intricate hives. Bit by bit they use little bits of wax to create the corridors and chambers that house themselves, their young, and their tasty honey. It's no small amount of work, either! It's actually estimated that bees must fly somewhere around 150,000 miles to produce 1 lb of wax!

Not only is this substance amazing within its natural form, but bricks of it are wonderful for the creation of a wide range of cosmetic products. It is often used for lip balms, skin lotions, and a wide range of other body care products as it is gentle upon the skin and can help seal keep moisturizing agents working their magic. They are also popularly melted down to create an assortment of beeswax candles.

 

2oz $4.95

$31.95

$2.95

Bergamot, cut ~

Also known by its Latin name, Monarda fistulosa, and most commonly under the name Bee Balm, Bergamot is native to North America and has a long history of use among the native tribes as well as the settlers that came after. A wide variety of native tribes recognized Bergamot for its medicinal properties, most commonly using it to treat colds in the form of an herbal tea. It was also widely used in the treatment of minor wounds as an antiseptic, and was similarly used to treat infections of the throat and mouth. Similarly today you can find it being used as a common ingredient within commercial mouthwash.

Modern herbalists typically still adhere to the old wisdom concerning Bergamot. Despite modern medicine, it is still known to be a useful herbal alternative in treating both the cold and flu, and to this end it is still used within an herbal tea, much like the natives did before us; though a strong dose of honey is often added as well, to aid with the strong flavor.

 

1oz $4.95

$64.95

$4.95

Beth Root, cut ~

Known by names such as Indian Shamrock, India Balm, Trillium Erectum, and Birth Root, Beth Root originates in middle and western portions of the United States, and has long seen use there by the Native American peoples of those regions. There, they used it as a treatment during child birth, perhaps to ease excess blood flow as many of the more modern traditions for the root seem to hold. Interestingly, and perhaps due to its link to fertility through its application during child birth, Beth Root also found a great deal of use by some Native Americans as an aphrodisiac. In folklore, some traditions also name it as a powerful addition to spells in which you are seeking to turn back or keep away negative magic, particularly when establishing a stationary sanctuary or otherwise protecting a home. It is also well known as a powerful aid in empowering and protecting your family.

From these roots it has come to be viewed in folk and holistic medicine, with a quite extensive list of properties. Most widely, it is known as an astringent and antiseptic, and as you might guess is therefore most commonly used for those reasons. Some also view Beth Root as a treatment for excessive blood loss during menopausal changes and menstrual cramping, as well as a treatment for blood loss in the urinary tract though it has been acknowledged that it does not actually cure the ailment that causes the blood loss in the first place. In other modern holistic uses it has also been used in treating coughs, bronchial problems, and pulmonary hemorrhage, though its effective application during such extreme cases such as pulmonary hemorrhage are widely debated by doctors.

 

2oz $3.95

$23.95

$2.95

Billberry Leaf Powder ~

Bilberry Leaf (Vaccinium Myrtilli), also known under the common names of Whortleberries, Blaeberries, and Huckle Berries, have long been used medicinally within western herbalism. The most prominent use reported is to improve ailing vision or otherwise increase night vision. Indeed, during World war II British pilots were even said to have used it to improve night vision before flying night missions. It is also worth noting that many herbalists speak of it performing well in other healing facets, and even aiding in treating muscle spasms.

Study of bilberry leaf reveals it to have high vitaman A and C content, and suggests that it might be able to aid with a range of degenerative disorders ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to glaucoma. Some of the reasoning behind this is perhaps that it may be responsible for strengthening connecting tissues as well as preventing damage from free radicals.

 

1oz $2.95

$27.95

$2.95

Black Cohosh Root Powder ~

Found under a variety of names, Black Cohosh Root (also known as Black Snake Root, macrotys, Bugbane, bugwort, rattleweed, and rattleroot) is an herb whose lore can be traced back to the Native American Indians, who then taught their medicinal practices to the local settlers. This is where it became a traditional home remedy and gained most of its common names, as it was commonly used as a treatment for snakebites for quite some time. During the 19th century it was also used for treating kidney stones, malaria, malaise, rheumatism, sore throat, and many other symptoms.

More modern herbalism has found that Black Cohosh root is still quite useful in treating gynecological disorders and various symptoms women experience during their normal bodily changes. Primarily this means that it is used in treating hotflashes, and other, similar, menopausal symptoms. The scientific community debates its usefulness in this and so their verdict is largely out until larger scale studies can be undertaken.

 

1oz $2.95

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$2.95

Black Haw Bark, cut ~

Rooted in American traditions that blend Native American lore with the methods of early settlers, Black Haw Bark (Viburnum prunifolium) is one of those herbs that can be found in Folk Lore under a wide range of names. These include American Sloe, King's Crown, Sheep Berry, Snowball tree, and stagbrush to name a few. Tradition holds that Native Americans used to use it in everything from the weaving of basket s to the creation of jams and medicines, but documentation we have on it comes from the lore passed down from the settlers.

In this lore, Black Haw Bark is widely believed to help increase fertility. In similar matters it is believed to aid a wide range of feminine issues, easing menstrual cramps and the physical symptoms of menopause and aiding aspects of pregnancy. Often it was prescribed as a preventative measure if there was believed to be a danger of miscarriage, or even to help ease morning sickness.

 

2oz $3.95

$15.95

$1.95

Bladderwrack, cut ~

A variety of seaweed found in numerous seas and oceans, Bladderwack can also be found under a wide assortment of names, including Fucus Vesiculosus, black tang, bladder focus, cut weed, dryers focus, rock wrack, and sea oak. Originally, it was utilized most as a source of iodine, and was discovered in 1811 to be a potent aid in treating goiters and similar issues involving iodine deficiency. Later, it was also thought of as an aid for stimulating the thyroid gland so as to encourage weight loss through an increased metabolic rate. Elsewhere, Bladderwrack is come to be used in assorted culinary arts. In Japan in particular it has become well known as an additive to dishes and foods, utilized for its flavoring. Otherwise, it has also come to be viewed by some herbalists and nutritionists as a nutritional supplement, and can sometimes be found in use as such.

In holistic medicine Bladderwrack is often believed to have a wide variety of uses. It is reputed to aid in easing the pain of rheumatism and rheumatoid arthritis, and is often taken both internally and occasionally rubbed against the aching joints. Some have also used it for the treatment of heartburn or as a laxative. Others still have seen it as a potent aid in strengthening the immune system, though there is still much debate about this attribute of the herb.

 

2oz $2.95

$15.95

$1.95

Blessed Thistle, cut ~

Frequently found documented as Cnicus benedictus, Holy Thistle, and St. Benedict Thistle, Blessed Thistle is a plant that originates in regions of the Europe that possess frequent contact with the Mediterranean, encompassing an area that stretches from Portugal to Iran. It now grows in North America, having been imported there, and is frequently viewed as a nuisance plant that grows in rocky terrain and disruptive of pastures and feed fields for cattle. It is difficult to kill, often requiring removal of the roots. Its name, contrary to the popular current view of the plant, is born of the belief that it is a powerful cure all that stems from the Medieval period of Europe. Indeed, it was often hailed as a powerful cure for the plague, possessing much magic and was even viewed as being an herb of Mars, under the sign of Aries.

Today, despite its bad rap among some farmers, it is also viewed as having many beneficial holistic qualities, including being of use in the treatment of loss of appetite and indigestion. Blessed Thistle is also sometimes used as a treatment for the early stages of fever and inflammatory infections. It is also aid to aid in breaking up colds and headaches, and in the treatment of wounds and skin abrasions.


1oz $6.95

$91.95

$6.95

Bloodroot, cut ~

Bloodroot (Sanguinarian canadenis), an herb popular among American herbalists, might also be found under the common names of bloodwort, red puccoon root, pauson, and tetterwort. It is perhaps most well known for the rich red coloring it can produce as a dye, and for this reason it is often popular among a many Native American artsits. Interestingly, it has also shown antibacterial or antiplaque qualities which have made it a popular addition to a number of commercial toothpastes. In folk magic it is generally believed to aid in spells of protection, love, and purification.

Herbalists explore Bloodroot for these qualities, and will occasionally recommend it for heart problems and migraines. It is also supposed to be great topically as an anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and general treatment for skin worts and tumors. It is important to note that you should note use this herb if you are pregnant or lactating. Health specialists also note that Bloodroot can be fatal if ingested in large doses.

 

1oz $2.95

$31.95

$2.95

Blue Cohosh Root, cut ~

Known commonly as papoose root and squa root, Blue Cohosh Root (Caulophyllum thalictroides) is another herb traditionally passed on from Native American tribes to European settlers. Among the various tribes it tended to have different known purposes. For example, among the Iroquise it was utilized for Arthritis, among the Mohegan it was for urinary tract infections, and among the Cherokee it was utilized as tranquilizer. In general terms it was also sometimes utilized for lung problems and fever.

Modern herbalism and tradition come together in depicting Blue Cohosh as an herbal supplement that can be used to induce labor and treat menstrual cramps. As always with any such herbal treatment you should consult your doctor before use. Due to the obvious hazards of ingestion, it should not be consumed if you are pregnant or nursing.

 

2oz $3.95

$18.95

$2.95

Boldo Leaf, cut ~

Boldo Leaf (Peumus Boldus) is an herb native to Chile and Peru, where it is modernly used often as a cooking spice. Excavations in those regions have actually indicated that it may well have been one of the herbs commonly used as far back as 10,000 years ago! Common mythology also says that the herb was largely ignored until a Chilean shepard found that his sheep were in better health after nibbling on Boldo leaves near his pasturage.

Since then it has also become a popular variety of folk medicine in the regions of Chile and Peru. There it is used to treat liver problems, including complications involving hepatitis, bladder infections, and gallstones. Some herbalists also explore Boldo Leaf as a useful alternative as a mild laxative that can help relieve gastrointestinal spasms. Others also explore it as a treatment for dysmenorrhea.

 

2oz $3.95

$22.95

$2.95

Borage Leaf, cut ~

Also known as starflower and Borage Officinalis, Borage originates in Syria, and has long since been naturalized in the Mediterranean, Asia Minor, Europe, North Africa, and South America. Often growing blue flowers, its petals can also take on the white and pink colors, and form the shape of a perfect five pointed star. Throughout history, the leaves however are what have stolen the attention from the beautiful flowers. They have been used in salads and as garnish extensively through Europe, and during the medieval period were sometimes used with wine in treating melancholy. Today they can still be found throughout Germany and parts of Spain and Poland as a vegetable. Borage Leaf has also been seen as a valued remedy for symptoms of PMS and Menopause, particularly when dealing with hot flashes. The leaves can also be used to make a calming tea, and are often used in Iran to make a tea that can sooth nerves and troubled spirits.

Holistically it has been used as well for the treatment of arthritis, eczema, seborhic dermatitis (scaly, crusty scalp), and in some cases chest congestion (in tea form). While it has long been seen as a potent aid, some modern study has also shown that continued, persistent use of the leaf can contribute to liver issues, and that it should not be used if you are breastfeeding or pregnant.


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$2.95

Brewer's Yeast Flour

Popular among vegans and vegetarians, nutritional yeast is perhaps most well known for its flavor, described occasionally as nutty or cheesy, and leaves it as a popular cheese substitute in recipes, or as a condiment. Perhaps notably it is used by vegans in place of parmesan cheese, and is popularly used to top popcorn, potatoes, and tofu or eggs. Used for much the same purpose globally, Nutritional Yeast is also known in Australia by the name of Savory Yeast, leaving it well known by that name as well. Among nutritionists, herbalists, and dietitians, Nutritional Yeast is well known as a fantastic source of protein and B-complex vitamins. It is most widely prescribed for the fact that it is a reliable source of Vitamin B12, and is therefore great for those who are deficient in that vitamin. For those on strict diets it is also naturally quite low in fat and sodium.

 

1oz $3.95

$38.95

$3.95

Bromelain Powder ~

Most frequently classified as an herb by those who use it, Bromelain powder actually consists of a digestive enzyme that is extracted from the Pineapple plant. Derived both from the stem and fruit of the plant, it is a fascinating discovery that is receiving a lot of attention from herbalists and the scientific community, primarily as an aid to digestion and as an anti-inflammatory.

Though further studies are required for conclusive results, it is suggested that Bromelain is quite capable of helping to reduce swelling. Some herbalists prescribe this to ease breathing conditions, as the reduced swelling can often ease air passages. It has also been shown that it does this while promoting healthy inflammatory reactions. In digestion, Bromelain powder has also demonstrated some ability to help improve the absorption of protein which can aid greatly with muscle growth.

 

1oz $3.95

$48.95

$3.95

Buchu Leaf Powder ~

Native to South Africa and possessing a scent similar to Pepperment, Buchu Leaf (Barosma Betulina) has been in popular use since the 16th century. Within the perfume industry its scent is frequently used for to create potent Pepperment scented fragrances. It is also sometimes used to create artificial flavors for Alcoholic drinks, desserts, and condiments. It has been suggested that originally it was used in Africa as an insect repellant, though later European use made it a popular hang over cure.

Modern herbalists, though still recommending it as a hangover remedy, still use it as it was during the 16th century, using it to treat kidney, urinary, and prostate problems. This is due to its evident ability to aid in treating both inflammation and infection.

 

2oz $5.95

$33.95

$3.95

Buckeyes, Whole ~

An important herb within traditional Chinese Medicine, Bupleurum Root (Bupleurum radix) is also known as "Chai hu" in Chinese, which translates to "Kindling for barbarians." Within the ancient Chinese systems, where Bupleurum Root powder is mentioned in texts as early as 200 A.D., it was primarily used to regulate the energy of the body and detoxify, removing impurities wastes, etc. Some practice within the old lore also uses it to treat unstable emotion.

Modern herbalists often prescribe Bupleurum Root powder as an antispasmodic, where it is useful in relieving spasms and muscle tension. It is also sometimes used as an anti-inflammatory, and a mild sedative. While these qualities make it useful in a variety of afflictions, they also warrant some caution in that Bapuleurum Root should not be used by those who are pregnant or nursing.

 

1oz $3.95

$33.95

$3.95

Bupleurum Root, Powder ~

An important herb within traditional Chinese Medicine, Bupleurum Root (Bupleurum radix) is also known as "Chai hu" in Chinese, which translates to "Kindling for barbarians." Within the ancient Chinese systems, where Bupleurum Root powder is mentioned in texts as early as 200 A.D., it was primarily used to regulate the energy of the body and detoxify, removing impurities wastes, etc. Some practice within the old lore also uses it to treat unstable emotion.

Modern herbalists often prescribe Bupleurum Root powder as an antispasmodic, where it is useful in relieving spasms and muscle tension. It is also sometimes used as an anti-inflammatory, and a mild sedative. While these qualities make it useful in a variety of afflictions, they also warrant some caution in that Bapuleurum Root should not be used by those who are pregnant or nursing.

 

2oz $2.95

$15.95

$1.95

Burdock Root, cut ~

Native to some parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa, Arctium lappa, or Burdock, is famous for its little fuzzy burs, that cling to animals and clothing and were reportedly the inspiration for Velcro. Folk herbalist in the past used it to purify blood and aid in burn treatment, where it was said to aid in impeding bacterial growth on the wound site, while providing a fantastic barrier for moisture which, in some cases, can impede the healing process. It has also seen use in spiritual applications as an herb that is particularly good in use for purification and protection, particularly against negativity and magick. Burdock has also seen use in treating stomach afflictions, particularly indigestion. Cosmetically, it has also been applied in the past to assorted methods for stimulating hair growth.

In more recent days it still sees heavy use in treating hair growth in Europe, and has been put to use for other forms of skin care including the treatment of eczema and in poultices put together for bruises and inflamed tissue. Burdock is also still utilized in treating indigestion, and has even been put to use in strengthening the stomach.

 

2oz $2.95

$14.95

$1.95

Burdock Root, powder ~

Most frequently viewed as little more than a common weed, Burdock is most recognized for their clinging burs that will stick to the fur and clothing of passing animals and people. Indeed, these little burs are so sticky that they were reportedly the inspiration for the creation of Velcro. However, the root is popular among herbalists in a variety of cultures. It is even cultivated in Japan where it is eaten as a vegetable in a manner similar to a carrot. Native Americans were also reported to have candied the root within Maple Syrup both for taste and as a preservative. In China it is sometimes used as an aphrodisiac.

Within herbal medicine, Burdock Root is generally considered to be useful in treating ulcers and sores. Within scientific study, it was used as part of a tea where it showed some ability as an anti-inflammatory and was exhibited to contain antioxidants.

 

2oz $3.95

$24.95

$2.95

Butcher's Broom Root, cut ~

Butcher's Broom root (Rascus aculeatus) gets its name from is former use in creating brooms used to sweep Butcher's stalls, and the use of the stems in protecting meats from rodent. A native to the Mediterranean, Southern Europe, Africa, and the Mid east, it was used throughout the ancient world, and is found in Pliny's writings, where he suggests it in the treatment of swelling veins. Later, Culpepper suggested it might be of use in treating broken bones.

Modern uses for Butcher's Broom root go back to the wisdom of Pliny, as modern herbalists traditionally recommend it for the treatment of varicose veins and similar circulatory matters. It is even recommended by German Commission E for this purpose. Interestingly the same commission also noted that Butcher's Broom Root is useful in treating hemorrhoids.

 

1oz $2.95

$24.95

$2.95

Calamus Root, Powder ~

Referred to in historical documents that reference its use for several thousand years, Calamus Root (Acorus calamus, Sweet Flag, Sweet Rush) has many storied uses. Dating back to the Sumerians and Ancient Egypt, its scent has been highly praised and even used as an incense. Within the dwellings of Britain and Europe, it was added to floor coverings and rushes where it was praised and valued for its fragrance. Spiritually, it was referenced has having been burned twice daily in the Hebrew temple as a sacred incense, and is associated with seeking out and working with your guardian angel.

Calamus Root has also possessed a long history of medicinal use throughout Europe and Asia and even North America. Within Ayurvedic medicine it is said to assist the digestive system and bring vigor to the brain and nervous system. In Chinese practice, it has also been used to treat chest congestion and similar matters. It should be noted that the FDA restricts the use of Calamus in foods and medicine, with past study showing that its use constitutes risks for further health problems.

 

2oz $4.95

$23.95

$2.95

Calendula Flowers ~

Though it is often referred to as Pot Marigold, Calendula, also known as Calendula officinalis, is not a marigold at all. Throughout the mid-ages and in times since, it has been widely known for treating skin wounds, abrasions and other afflictions and infections of the skin, having been said to be of particular use as an anti-inflammatory. In some cases it has even been said to be put to use in treating chapped lips and diaper rash. They were also known and documented for being a flower that opened and closed regularly, with some saying from dawn to dusk and others even citing specific times, such as seven in the morning until seven at night. Spiritually, Calendula has been put to use in providing a comfort to the heart, or aiding in mending spirits, and it was said that a broth flavored with the herb was particularly good for this. Calendula even saw culinary use, being used to dye cheese with a yellow color in the past.

Today it is primarily used much as it was in the past, to treat skin wounds and abrasions as an anti-inflammatory, making it helpful in treating sprains and other such injuries where muscle or joints swell up uncomfortably. Some herbalists have also found it to be helpful in stimulating sweating, and easing fevers.


1oz $1.95

$20.95

$2.95

Camphor Block ~

The waxy white blocks of camphor are perhaps best known for the pungent aroma that they possess, that is quite reminiscent of many topical rubs used in treating cold, cough and flu. Derived from the oils found within a variety of trees within Asia and Indonesia, it has been used for ages in helping to repel moths and other insects, and has also been used for its antimicrobial properties, particularly in embalming. In ancient and medieval Europe and china it was even used as a flavoring agent for sweets as well as many Arabic dishes of the mid ages. Indeed, you can still find sweets flavored with camphor throughout Asia.

Today, Camphor can still be found in household medicines for cold, cough and flu, and is frequently used by herbalists as a home remedy to clear up sinus and chest congestion by using it topically upon the chest. It is also quite useful spiritually in helping to renew the spirit, and find new vigor while at the same time soothing the nerves. Some also associate it with psychic abilities and prophetic dreams. It is important to note that the FDA discourages the medical use of of camphor.

1oz $3.95

$38.59

$3.95

Camu Camu Fruit Powder ~

Native to the Amazon Rain forests of Brazil and Peru, Camu Camu fruit (Myrciaria dubia) is now a popularly used edible fruit. Interestingly, it is one of the few such fruit that does not demonstrate any evident traditional usage. This is likely to the high acidity of the fruit, and the taste which is generally enjoyable after it has been diluted within drinks and other confections. Commercially, it is commonly used in flavoring ice cream and sweets.

Modern herbalists explore the use of Camu Camu fruit powder as a nutritional supplement due to its high Vitamin C and amino acid content. Because of this nutritional value, it is sometimes used to boost the immune system. Camu Camu fruit is also sometimes used to help fight depression, as it has shown that it can help lift moods. Further study is required to yield more complete findings regarding this however.

 

1oz $3.95

$42.95

#3.95

Cape Aloes Powder ~

Also commonly known by Bitter Aloes and Cape aloes gets its name from its native origins in South Africa where it grew within the Cape province. There it grows with the appearance of a spiky, red-flowering bush that gives it its Latin name, Aloe ferox, which translates roughly into fierce Aloe, or Warlike Aloe. For centuries this darker variety of aloe has been used by sailors in treating rope burns, salt-exposure injury, and other ailments. In all likelihood they taught the medical use to missionaries who then spread teachings of its curative properties to the Natives of the Americas.

The most commonly recognized herbal usage of all varieties of Aloe the curative properties of the inner gel that is most frequently applied to minor burns and abrasions. However, the "rind" or latex of the plant has also been known to be as strong laxative and is sometimes used for this purposes as a purgative. It has also been explored for is usage in treating arthritis and has been proscribed as a main ingredient in pharmaceutical grade arthritis treatments throughout Europe for some time. It is advised to avoid use if pregnant.

 

1oz $4.95

$61.95

$4.95

Cardamom Pods, whole ~

Treasured within the ancient world as well as the modern as a culinary spice, Cardamom (elettaria cardamomum) has seen use throughout the Mediterranean region and Asia for centuries. Its potent, aromatic scent and equally unique flavor is perhaps most notably found today within Middle Eastern cuisine and dishes from Southern Asia, and it also appears with frequency within Nordic baked goods, such as the breads Pulla and Julekake. Within some new age practices, Cardamom's unique flavor and aroma is used within practices intended to invoke love and lust.

In traditional medicinal practices of Southern Asia, Cardamom has been used to treat a range of ailments from asthma and bronchitis to kidney stones. Within traditional Chinese medicine, Cardamom is associated with the channels of the lung and stomach, and it is typically used to promote the flow of Qi, with other uses sometimes prescribed where it is used to "warm."

 

2oz $3.95

$21.95

$2.95

Cascara Sagrada Bark, cut ~

Cascara Sagrada is the commercial name for Rhomnus Purshiana. It is also known by the common names of cascara and bearberry, and is actually a species of buckthorn. Cascara Sagrada, meaning "Sacred Bark" in Spanish, has actually been used for 100s of years by Native Americans of the Pacific region medicinally as a laxative. In this, it is always dried as a powder with the fresh bark often providing more drastic results that one might desire.

Modern herbalists still prescribe Cascara Sagrada as a laxative, and it can be found in many pharmacies. Up until recently, it was still widely used in over the counter, commercial laxatives though of late it has been discontinued in favor of gentler options. This is due to the fact that side effects of Cascara Sagrada may include cramping or abdominal pain, and diarrhea.

 

2oz $3.95

$14.95

$1.95

Catnip, cut ~

Also known as Catmint and its Latin name of Nepeta Cataria, Catnip is actually the broad name for over 250 flowering species of plants that belong to the genus of Nepeta. Originally from Mediterranean regions, Catnip has since become common throughout North America, and is famous for the effects it has on cats. In two thirds of all cats, catnip induces a state of euphoria, often resulting in them acting rather off the wall and crazy, frequently in manners that are entirely impossible to predict. The remaining third of cats are actually completely immune to this effect, and have no observed reaction to the herb. Interestingly, some people also experience a much milder version of this euphoria, and it is sometimes employed in spiritual and magickal purposes to help find this state of mind or help forge a psychic bond with animals.

Today, it is most commonly found in cat toys around the world, but catnip tea has also been found to be quite beneficial in treating colds, fevers, and other infections. Some studies also suggest that it is soothing for upset stomachs and may possibly be helpful in preventing morning sickness in pregnant women. Catnip has also been shown to be employed successfully in a mosquito repellant when applied to the skin in a variety of lotions and ointments.

 

1oz $2.95

$23.95

$2.95

Cat's Claw Bark, cut ~

This herbal treatment, known in Latin as Uncaria Tomentosa, is named after the hook-like horns that are found on its surface, and comes from a vine native to the Amazon Rain Forest and other similarly tropical locals within South and Central America. There, it has been found in traditional medicinal folk lore dating back to the age of the Incans, and is frequently described as a potent aid in treating health problems, such as arthritis, stomach ulcers, fever, and general inflammation. Some lore even suggests that the bark can be utilized when one is seeking a method of birth control.

More Modern studies have shown that Cat's Claw Bark is indeed a stimulant to the immune system, helping it fight off disease and perhaps thereby relieving symptoms such as fever. Some herbalists also claim that it can be of great use in relaxing and soothing muscles, helping to ease away aches and pains. This is of particular use when combined with the fact that the bark has shown some ability to treat and ease assorted forms of arthritis. Some studies have also shown that Cat's Claw Bark can help lower blood pressure as well, and act as a diuretic. The bark has also been shown to possess antioxidant properties, which remove the body of particles that damage cells and potentially cause cancer. Early studies are looking into this quality, and examining its antitumor and anticancer effects.

 

1oz $2.95

$30.95

$2.95

Catuaba Bark, Powder ~

Catuaba Bark powder (Erythoroxylum Catuaba) has a long history of use, dating back for centuries. Among the Topi Indians, it is considered a traditional aphrodisiac and has been used its sex-enhancing properties for centuries. Legends regard it as being capable of lending strength to those who use it, and otherwise reducing fatigue. Lore even holds that it can improve memory.

Herbalists traditionally use Catuaba Bark powder as a nerve tonic, where it is commonly said to help ease nervousness and anxiety, and improve memory. However, the long-standing use of Catuaba Bark remains the most popular, and it is primarily known for its ability increase male libido and sexual function.

 

2oz $2.95

$20.95

$1.95

Cedar Tips

 

1oz $2.95

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$2.95

Centaury, Cut ~

Likely named for the mythological Centaur Chiron, who was revered in Greek lore as a wise herbalist and who actually cured himself of poison through his herbal craft, Centaury (Centaurium Erythae) is an herb known to history for healing and magical qualities. Known also as Felwort or Fel Terrae, it was referenced within Le Petit Albert as one of fifteen magical herbs, within suggestion that it can help achieve magical awareness. Elsewhere it was also believed to be a powerful aid in prevailing against evil spirits.

Within more traditional herbalism, Centaury is favored for treating matters of the bladder, kidneys, and the digestive tract in general. It is well regarded as an herbal supplement that can aid in relieving constipation, heartburn, gas, and other such symptoms.

 

2oz $2.95

$15.95

$1.95

Chaparral Leaf, cut

Native to the Southwestern parts of US and Mexico, Chaparral Leaf, or Larrea tridentata has long been used among Native Americans to treat arthritis, respiratory ailments, and even cancer. Interestingly, the plant produces a sap that keeps other plants from growing near itself, and while the branches may wither or fall off, the crown rarely dies and sometimes reproduces itself. Indeed, an example in California is believed by some to be well over 11,000 years old. For these qualities it was often revered within local lore, and the Southwestern Native Americans often used the sap as a sunscreen, and the plant in general as a treatment for assorted ailments, including blood poisoning, and liver disease. They also used to the leave to brew a tea that they would use to rid the body of parasites.

Modern herbalists see it most commonly as an expectorant, of great use in treating respiratory issues like asthma, bronchitis, and the coughing symptoms of the common cold. Chaparral Leaf has also been shown to possess antioxidant qualities, believed to help destroy the particles that destroy cells and possibly cause cancer. Studies have been conducted that show the leaf to aid in restricting cancerous growth. While the leaf possesses a great many positive qualities, it has been shown to occasionally react poorly with the liver, and you should discontinue use if you experience nausea, fever, fatigue, or Jaundice while using the herb.

 

2oz $2.95

$18.95

$1.95

Chamomile Flower, whole

While known in Latin as Anthemis Nobilis, Chamomile actually gets its name from the Greek words kamai, which means on the ground, and melon, which is the word for an apple. When trod upon, it frequently produces a strong, pleasant aroma that wafts around those who step upon it, and reminds many of apples. For this purpose it was often put to use in the medieval periods for use in green garden paths, so that as one strolled from one place to another one would be accompanied by a lovely, sweet smell. In the past, herbalists and gardeners also saw Chamomile as a healing plant that would help those plants it grew next to flourish when otherwise they might begin to fail. It spiritual uses Chamomile was also frequently used in finding good luck with marriage proposals, gambling, prosperity and good fortune, and was even thought to aid in preventing lightning strikes.

In the world today, Chamomile is perhaps most famous as a component in tea that is not only smells lovely and is pleasantly flavorful, but is widely known for helping to soothe stomachs and ease indigestion as well as help you fall to sleep. It is also well known for being a soothing sedative that aids with pain and discomfort.

 

2oz $3.95

$15.95

$2.95

Chaste Tree Berries, while

Native to the Mediterranean region and southern Europe, the Chaste Tree, or Vitex agnus-castus, is actually a large flowering shrub that has been utilized within medicine and spiritual practice since ancient times. With both the berries and the plant frequently used (the berries in particular), it was most commonly planted among the Greeks and Romans as a living ward against evil, that could help inspire chastity in those who dwelled near it. Monks of Europe also used it for similar reasons, using the dried berries crushed within their food to decrease their sex drive and perhaps make it easier to honor their vows of chastity.

More modern usage has shown though that the berries can actually exhibit an effect on the pituitary gland of rats, which coincides with the practice of modern herbalists who use it to balance hormones. It is most commonly used now to aid with disorders of the female reproductive system, where it has been shown to reduce milk production and aid in correcting menstrual cycle abnormalities. It is also a popular herb among many herbalists for treating menopausal hot flashes.

 

2oz $3.95

$17.95

$2.95

Cherry Bark, wild

Native to the central and northern parts of the North America, wild cherry bark, or Prunus serotina, has long been known by Native Americans as a potent medicinal plant, but only came into widespread use in the 1800s, when European immigrants and settlers brought it back to catch on in Europe. It was then that it began seeing widespread use as an aid in the treatment of coughs, particularly those of the spasmodic variety that interrupts sleep and could otherwise cause further complication in the treatment of wounds and illness.

These days, the wild cherry bark is often utilized in modern cough syrups, as it has been found to sedate the cough reflex. This is particularly useful in treating dry, nonproductive coughs that occur in a wide array of respiratory conditions, particularly those that disrupt and prevent sleep. By itself, it is also often used with other herbs in the treatment of asthma, and similar such breathing disorders. Wild cherry bark has also been found by some herbalists to be quite helpful in stimulating sluggish digestion and appetite.

 

2oz $3.95

$16.95

$1.95

Chickweed, cut ~

Chickweed, or Stellaria media L is well known among a great many herbalists as being a fantastic both for medicinal purposes as well as a nutritional supplement. Flowering form March until the following autumn, it is also quite famed for the fact that it sleeps the "Sleep of Plants." This is an old herbal term for the fact that the leaves shift every night, folding over to cover and protect tender buds and new shoots as though sheltering them in sleep. Chickweed is also often added to salads or added to cooking pots as a delightful spice, and is often compared to spinach in matters of taste and texture, as well as for the nutrients that it provides. Sometimes uncooked leaves are also served with dandelion leaves in salads.

Nutritionally, Chickweed is mineral-rich, containing ascorbic acid, calcium, flavenoids, magnesium, potassium, zinc and numerous other beneficial minerals well known for aiding in achieving a general state of well being. Medically it has been used as an astringent and a diuretic, and is reputed to be quite useful as an expectorant and laxative. In the past, it was also used often for wound treatment. Some studies have also shown that it can be quite useful in treating post partum issues, functioning as a depurative, emmenagogue, and galactogogue.

 

2oz $2.95

$11.95

$1.95

Chicory Root Granules ~

Known to be cultivated both for culinary and medical purposes as far back as Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Greeks, Chicory Root granules (Cichorium intybus) remain popular throughout Europe and American today. This is in part due to the popularity of its caffeine-like effects despite being naturally decaffeinated, which results in it sometimes being used as a substitute to coffee. Indeed, when it is ground up and roasted it is sometimes impossible to distinguish from coffee grounds. Its popularity as such has perhaps not quite caught on though, due to its notably sour taste.

When brewed as a tea or tonic, Chicory Root is sometimes used to ease digestive disorders and is known to be of use in treating gallstone problems. It is also popular among farmers who will sometimes use it as a forage supplement. This is due to the fact that it in addition to its ability to ease digestive matters, it is also known to be toxic to internal parasites.

 

1oz $4.95

$54.95

$4.95

Chlorella Powder ~

Actually a variety of Algae, Chlorella blossomed into widespread popularity that reached its height during the 1940's as it was explored by scientists as a possible solution to stemming growing world hunger. In exploration for an abundant, high quality food source, scientists found that Chlorella could produce large amounts of protein, amino acids, fats, calories, and vitamins. Initial predictions also pointed to enormous yields of Chlorella as a cultivated crop with only minimal labor and manpower. This research was eventually abandoned however as it was discovered that it could only grow to full potential with artificial lighting and conditions as well as with the use of carbonated water; various conditions that increased the cost of Chlorella substantially.

Despite the difficulties in producing it on as massive scale as might originally been preferred, Chlorella remains a fantastically healthy dietary supplement. Studies suggest that in addition to its nutrients, it can also help manage high blood pressure and lower serum cholesterol levels. Studies have also shown it can help speed up wound healing and can generally improve immune functions.

 

2oz $3.95

$21.95

$2.95

Cilantro Leaf, cut ~

Perhaps best known as a the herb found in everything from pickles, to salsa, to salad, Cilantro (also known as Coriandrum sativum, coriander or Chinese parsley), has been Cultivated in South Eastern Europe, Egypt, India , and China for thousands of years. Indeed it is mentioned in Sanskrit texts, the Bible, The Arabian Nights (a 1000 year old book of fables), and numerous other such sources. Within spiritual lore, it is widely believed to be an aphrodisiac, and is spoken of as such in both Chinese traditions, where it was used as a love potion, and in Arabic lore where it was used to make a childless man fertile. The Chinese also believed it to be an important ingredient within a potion of importability.

Medicinally, herbalists most frequently utilize cilantro as a digestive stimulant, where it is widely believed to aid in the secretion of gastric juices. Some also prepare Cilantro, or coriander as it is more commonly spoken of in herbalist communities, to relieve painful joints and rheumatism.

 

2oz $2.95

$12.95

$1.95

Cinnamon Cut ~

Known and used for thousands of years, the very name of Cinnamon has roots that date back as far as the Phoenicians. Among the Ancient Greeks, Egyptians, and other cultures of antiquity it was a tremendous treasure, coming out of the mysterious east, and was frequently regarded as a gift that was fit for offering to Gods and Kings. The true source of cinnamon then remained a mystery throughout the middle ages, with Europeans typically believing wild stories involving its origins, from it being brought up on fishing nets from the source of the Nile to the belief that it was gathered from the nests of Cinnamon birds. It also has deep roots within spirituality, and within many practices and traditions is believe to be of aid in empowering and encouraging spiritual growth, love, and prosperity, making it a powerful addition to love spells, and spells of money drawing.

Despite these rumors and myths, cinnamon is actually a product of the bark of an evergreen tree from Sri Lanka, known as cinnamon verum. Today the spice is primarily used within culinary practices, and is frequently regarded as one of the few spices truly edible in its raw form. Whether powdered, shaved, cut or whole, it is used in a wide variety of cultures throughout the world. Medicinally, many herbalists traditionally use it in herbal medicine to help soothe the stomach and it is often regarded as a wonderful aid in treating digestive problems. Oils from Cinnamon are also found to contain antimicrobial properties, making it of use as a preservative as well.


2oz $1.95

$10.95

$1.95

Cinnamon Powder ~

Coming from the bark of an evergreen tree native to Sri Lanka, cinnamon powder has long been known as a wonderful, powerful seasoning that adds to a wide array of culinary dishes. The tree itself grows in soil that is quite sandy, even as it requires a somewhat sheltered area, rain, heat, and a stable temperature. This left the product of cinnamon powder a difficult to obtain commodity for some time, as the Dutch who harvested believed that its cultivation would actually destroy the properties it is known to possess, and only began to grow it as recently as 1776. The properties of the powder are many and varied, with long belief that it was useful for healing and personal protection, as well as a wide range of spiritual qualities, including use in meditation, passion and love spells, work involving clairvoyance, and for spiritual illumination. It is also traditionally associated with the fire and the sun.

Also known as Cinnamomum Burmanii, Cinnamon is today most widely known as a culinary seasoning, seeing use in everything from flavoring for chewing gum to gourmet dishes. Beyond this, it has also been known as an aphrodisiac for females as well as an antiseptic, astringent, and as a powerful aid in helping with digestive issues ranging from flatulence and vomiting to diarrhea.

 

2oz $3.95

$18.95

$2.95

Cleavers Herb, cut ~

Used sometimes in culinary dishes after being prepared in a manner similar to spinach, Cleavers Herb (Galium Aparine) has been a popular addition to kitchens and herbalists cupboards for centuries. Within folkore, Cleavers herb is also perhaps most famous for being part of a tribal love spell. Within this spell it is said to have been used to create a ritual bath that would bring the one who bathed in it good fortune in love. In another tradition, this one coming from Sweden, mats were woven of Cleavers herb and used to filter milk. This was believed to lend the milk healing powers.

Modern herbalists often prescribe cleavers herb to help detoxify the body, and sometimes use it to treat urinary tract infections. Its high vitamin C content also leads to it sometimes being used to help boost the immune system. Topically, Cleavers herb is sometimes used in treating skin problems from eczema to bug bites.

 

2oz $3.95

$24.95

$2.95

Cloves, whole ~

Cloves or Dalea purpurea, are most widely known as a culinary spice, native to Indonesia. Its use has spread widely, with uses ranging from being a key component in tea in Northern India, a frequent part of Vietnamese pho broth, a wide array of Mexican dishes, and even as a frequent addition to cheese in the Netherlands. In Japan and china, one will also find cloves used as an important material for incense, and in some European countries one will find them around Christmas and Yule as a holiday decoration, called a Pomander, where the cloves are inserted into an orange and hung about the home. Spiritually, they are seen to be of great use in banishing hostile and negative forces, as well as aiding in enhancing or starting friendship and love.

In both Chinese and Western medicine, cloves have seen use in dentistry, where its oil is a painkiller. In this way, it is also sometimes used to numb away irritation and pain on the skin. They are also used in a variety of ways to aid in digesting, soothing the stomach, or even relieving gas. In aromatherapy, Cloves have seen use in clearing the head, as well. In Chinese medicine it is also utilized sometimes in treating impotence or morning sickness.

 

2oz $3.95

$23.95

$2.95

Clover, Red, whole ~

Red clover, or Eugenia caryophyllata, has long been seen as a flower with many spiritual and medicinal uses. Of old, it was seen as something that can purify blood so that the one who imbibed the clover would be hearty and hale, and improve circulation. It was also used as a diuretic, to cleanse the body of excess fluids and toxins, wherein it was thought to help cleanse and strengthen the liver. For colds, it was also used as an expectorant, helping to clear the lungs of mucus and fluid. Spiritually, it was widely seen as a powerful agent in bringing good luck to financial arrangements, or blessing and protecting domestic animals. The flowers were also often mixed into potions intended to induce lust in those who drank them.

Modern herbalist still view Red Clover as a potent aid in helping coughs and colds, using it to aid and treat whooping cough and a wide range of other respiratory problems. Red clover is also often used externally, treating skin irritation and swelling, psoriasis, and eczema.

1oz $5.95

$77.95

$5.95

Collagen Powder ~

Collagen power is actually a protein that is most commonly found as a part of the cartilage, bone, and tissues within animals. Doctors and nutritionists have been exploring its use in helping with joint pain associated with arthritis, as well as various forms of back pain, neck pain, and other such pain associated with injuries. Collagen used in this manner is typically derived from chickens.

The exact method by which Collagen helps is still being studied, but it is said to help produce substances that help fight pain and swelling within the joints. What is known is that Collagen powder contains chondroitin and glucosamine; two substances known to help rebuild cartilage within joints.

 

2oz $3.95

$24.95

$2.95

Coltsfoot Leaf, cut

For thousands of years Coltsfoot Leaf, or Tussilago farfara, has been used as an ancient cough medicine, suppressing coughs from colds and illness via a wide array of treatments. Indeed, it was even used in smoking blends as a method to ease breathing. For ages it was recommended for dry coughs and breathing problems, with attention paid to these properties in the writings of the Greek doctor Diosocrites. Some also believe that it will help improve one's luck in seeking prosperity, wealth, and love. There was some debate however between East and West as to what portion of the Coltsfoot plant was the most useful medicinally. In China, the thought was that the root was most potent and most beneficial, while in Europe it was generally believed that the leaf provided the greatest benefit.

Today, it is still popular in suppressing coughs, with research showing that extracts from the leaf can improve the immune system, as well. Modern research has also shown that it should not be taken by pregnant women or given to children under the age of six, with some countries even implementing strict age restrictions regarding the availability and usage of Coltsfoot.


2oz $3.95

$23.95

$2.95

Comfrey Leaf, cut

Widely acknowledged as being an herb of great medicinal value, Comfrey Leaf has been known throughout the ages under a wide variety names with Bruisewort, Knitback, Boneset, Slippery Root, Ass Ear, and Blackwort being among them. In China, it has been used for well over 2000 years, and has maintained its reputation well enough to see mention in a US Pharmacopia and numerous other medical journals and herbal compendiums throughout the world. Most commonly, it is used as an ointment or poultice that is applied to sprains, broken bones, and other wounds where it is said to help in mending and healing. In ancient times, it was also said to be quite potent in aiding spells of protection and blessings for travel.

Today, it is still a popular first aid remedy, containing the chemical allantoin which is said to speed up the replacement of body cells. This speeds up the healing of tissue and the closing of wounds, and aids in mending bones just as it has since ancient times. Many herbalists also use it to minimize the opportunity of infection and reduce scarring. Recent studies have resulted in concerns about liver damage from Comfrey's use, however.

 

1oz $2.95

$26.95

$2.95

Comfrey Root, cut (organic)

Native to Europe and particularly widespread in Britain and Ireland, the entire Comfrey plant (Symphytum Officinale) is generally revered in folk medicine as an ingredient in a wide range of tonics. It's popular name of "knit bone" speaks for itself, describing the way it was often used of old to help speed the healing of breaks, sprains, fractures, and other such wounds and injury.

Herbalists have traditionally used Comfrey Root in salves that speed healing for hundreds of years, and it is often considered an important part of an herbalist's garden. More recent study has left the use of comfrey for healing purposes as rather controversial however. It has been shown to contain PAs, or a variety of alkaloids believed to potentially cause liver problems.

 

1oz $3.95

$48.95

$3.95

Coral Calcium Powder

Coral Calcium is a mineral found deposited in coral reefs. As coral reefs are endangered, it is derived from above ground deposits of limestone that were formally part of coral reefs that are ground down and processed. The result is potent source of minerals that is popularly used as a dietary supplement. Having been part of an ancient coral reef it is also useful in spells and rituals as an aspect of the Sea, helping to represent the element of Water.

Much more controversially, Coral calcium has been promoted in the past as a valuable treatment for a wide range of medical ailments. However, many of these claims have been largely unsubstantiated. Indeed, it was formerly promoted as a potential cure for cancer which resulted prosecution from the Federal Trade Commission and Coral Calcium being placed on the list of "Fake Cures for Cancer" published by the FDA. Many herbalists still value it for its theorized healing properties however.

 

2oz $2.95

$8.95

$1.95

Coriander Seed, whole

Native to Southern Europe, North Africa, and South West Asia, Coriander seed perhaps most well known for its use in cooking, and is a popular spice in wide range of culinary traditions throughout the world. It is also known to folk medicine, most notably the Ayurvedic practices of India, and can be found commonly being used help with digestive matters..

Within Ayurvedic practices, Coriander seeds are sometimes used to treat nausea and morning sickness, as well as other digestive matters such as diarrhea. The modern scientific community has been exploring Coriander for its benefits in breaking down cholesterol into other compounds. Studies have indicated that Coriander seeds can lower cholesterol, triglycerides, and increase high-density lipoprotein levels.

 

1oz $4.95

$56.95

$4.95

Cramp Bark, cut

Native to Europe and Asia, Cramp Bark (Viburnum Opulus) is also known by the names of Guelder Rose, Water Elder, European Cranberry bush, and snowball tree. This causes some confusion occasionally, as it is not really a variety of Rose, Elder, or Cranberry. Growing most commonly as an ornamental plant and as part of hedgerows, it is also revered for its spiritual symbolism in Ukranian lore. With roots in Slavic paganism, it is associated with the birth of the Universe, with the berries found on the plant often tied in to the "Fire Trinity, or the Sun, Moon, and Stars.

The common name, Cramp Bark, is however born of the most common practice of the herbalists who revere it: it is used to help alleviate menstrual cramping. Further, many herbalists will prescribe it to aid with post partum discomfort ad in preventing miscarriages. Its muscle relaxant qualities have also left it being explored for the treatment of asthma and some varieties of arthritis.

 

1oz $2.95

$31.95

$2.95

Creatine Monohydrate Powder

Creatine Monohydrate (commonly referred to simply as Creatine) is perhaps one of the longest explored nutritional supplements specifically focused upon aiding body builders and athletes. First documented in medical journals for its use in helping to build muscle as early as 1926, creatine is a natural compound produced in the body to supply muscles with energy, and is contained in a wide range of meats and other foods. As a 100% natural product found within many food sources, it is one of the few such muscle-building compounds even allowed by the Olympics and Professional sports leagues.

Creatine is popularly prescribed to those who are seeking to athletes seeking to build muscle. It can increase lean muscle mass and others help improve performance in exercises. Clinical studies have demonstrated notably increased energy levels among those who use Creatine, as well as improved muscle recovery rates after vigorous exercise.

 

2oz $4.95

$29.95

$2.95

Damiana Leaf, cut

Traditionally, Damiana Leaf, also known as Tumera diffusa, has been used by the people of Central and South America for hundreds of years. There it was first recorded by Spanish Missionaries as it was used by Mexican Indians, using Damiana leaves mixed with sugar as a powerful tea that enhanced lovemaking and worked as a powerful aphrodisiac. It is also named in Mexican folklore as the ingredient that flavored the original margarita; an alcoholic drink now famous throughout the world. Damiana has also seen use a wide array of magical tradition and practices, being used often in sex magic, increasing magical energy and aiding in divination, including use in dream magic and clairvoyance.

In modern holistic use, Damiana leaf is still used as an aphrodisiac, but is reported to be of medicinal aid in treating coughs, constipation and depression. It is also said to help with fibromyalgia, and breathing issues, as well as impotency, infertility, and the varied symptoms of menopause.

 

2oz $3.95

$16.95

$2.95

Dandelion Leaf, cut

Known by most homeowners and landscapers as a weed that is nearly impossible to eradicate, Dandelion Leaf, or Taraxacum Officinale, is actually a valuable herb, with numerous culinary and medicinal uses. Native Americans long used it to treat kidney diseases, swelling, skin problems, heartburn, and upset stomachs, while the Chinese would use it as a treatment for digestive disorders, appendicitis, and even breast problems which include inflammation or lack of milk. In Europe, herbalists used to incorporate it into remedies that treated fever, boils, diarrhea and eye problems, as well as diabetes. The leaf is also believed to be of great use in summoning spirits, as well as in purification rituals.

Today, Dandelion leaf is more commonly used as a diuretic, to remove excess water and toxins from the body. It is also said to promote bile excretions from the liver so the body can process foods and liquids more efficiently while purging toxins. More common still, it is used simply as an appetite stimulant and digestive aid, even included in salads and similar such dishes, or as a garnish.

 

2oz $2.95

$9.95

$1.95

Dead Sea Salt

The dead sea is a unique feature of the world. Not only is it a landlocked sea but it contains ten times the salt of any other body of water in the world. What's more, it is found at the center of the "Holy Land," a region that has given rise to a wide range from the ancient Zoroastrianism and Judaism to Islam and Christianity. The result is a local that shows up often in various mythologies and legends, that has become a popular health spa due to its waters unique properties.

As a result, the salts collected from the Dead Sea have also become popular world wide as part of skin care and curative products. It is widely believed to help stimulate blood circulation when used in baths and soaks, and is often used to aid with common skin ailments such as acne or psoriasis. Many also use it to relieve allergic reactions. Remarkably, dead sea salt has also shown to be of use in treating aging skin, reducing wrinkle depth measurably.

 

1oz $8.95

$119.95

$8.95

Deer Antler Velvet Powder

Deer Antler, or more specifically the velvet from deer antler, has been used within herbal medicine and traditional lore for thousands of years. The first records date back to ancient China, where within traditional Chinese medicine it was utilized within several tonics over the years used to improve bone health, nourish blood, and even treat impotence. Within traditional Chinese medicine, it is generally believed to replenish yin, tonify qi, and strengthen yang.

Today the usage of Deer Antler has not much changed. While it is less commonly used as a sexual enhancer, or aphrodisiac, Deer Antler is still a popular option for helping to treat arthritic pain and similar such injury. Study has shown that components within it can help lubricate and repair joints, and sometimes reduce inflammation, backing this traditional treatment. Other studies have also explored the possibilities of Deer Antler improving cell growth, boosting the immune system, and possible even help in the creation of anti-tumor treatments.

 

1oz $3.95

$39.95

$3.95

Devil's Claw Root Powder

Devil's Claw Root (Harpagophytum procumbens) has a long history of traditional use within the medicinal practices of the native tribes within Southern Africa. The root, which has a distinct, claw-like appearance, is often allowed to dry in the sun before it is used to relieve pain, improve digestion and treat heartburn, reduce fever, ease headaches, and even help treat some allergies. As European explorers became acquainted with the root, it became quite popular among the English and the Dutch, and was used for treating arthritis.

In modern usage, Devil's Claw Root is most recognized for relieving joint and muscle pain, and there have been multiple studies examining how it works. Scientists are still uncertain as to how exactly it functions, but they have shown that it does not function like a Cox-2 inhibitor, and therefore does not include the harmful side effects that can manifest in the cardiovascular system. Testing in Germany and France has revealed that Devil's Claw Root can function as an anti-inflammatory, improving mobility and aiding pain relief.

 

1oz $8.95

$120.95

$8.95

Devil's Shoestring

 

2oz $3.95

$18.95

$2.95

Dog Grass Root, cut

Having a long history of use since classical Greece, Dog Grass Root (triticum repens) is known also known as a wide variety of common names, including wheat grass, couch grass, and witch grass. Indeed, it has become naturalized throughout the world, and is even widely considered a weed due to its invasive growth and the difficulty in removing them. However, there have been reports of sick dogs digging up the roots and eating them; an occurrence that perhaps led to the ancient Greeks and the medieval herbalists (who also used it as an incense in Northern Europe) that followed discovering that it was quite useful in treating infections of the urinary tract.

This practice has continued into the modern era, with herbalists generally recognizing Dog Grass Root as a diuretic that can sooth inflammation of mucosal linings, particularly those along the urinary tract. This can be useful in treating the pain of urinary infections and similar discomfort.

 

2oz $3.95

$19.95

$2.95

Dong Quai Powder

Used for thousands of years as a spice, tonic and medicine, Dong Quai is perhaps most well known in China, Korea, and Japan, where the influence of traditional Chinese medicine has perhaps had the most impact. Within this tradition, it is often viewed as the Female ginseng as it is frequently utilized to balance and harmonize the female system. It is also believed to be of great influence of the meridians of the heart, liver and spleen as well as help strengthen Yin Energy.

Today, Dong Quai is still used for many of the traditional purposes, including menopause treatment, fertility treatment, and recovery from childbirth. In general, it is believe to be of help in regulating the menstrual cycle and otherwise be a useful ingredient in tonics intended to aid the health of women.

 

1oz $3.95

$39.95

$3.95

Dulse Powder

Dulse Powder (Rhodymenia Palmata), also known as Red Dulse or Sea Lettuce, is derived from a red seaweed found primarily within the Northern Atlantic. Here it can be found primarily along coastal regions along the shores of Canada, Ireland, and Norway. Among these seafaring cultures it became a popular addition to meals and salads as dietary supplement, and among sailors as a cure for scurvy and parasitic infection among sailors, and would also sometimes be used to relieve constipation.

Modern herbalists enjoy Dulse Powder as a great source of iodine. It is also often used as a gentle alternative to psyllium or senna for the treatment of constipation. Dulse is also growing in popularity as a nutritional supplement due to the large amounts of vitamins and minerals that it contains.

 

2oz $3.95

$21.95

$2.95

Echinacea Augustifolia, cut

Popular among frontiersmen and settlers, the properties of Echinacea Augustifolia, or Elk Root, were likely taught first by the Native Americans from the regions in which it commonly grows. There it was reportedly first discovered by stalking Elk who would seek out the plant when it was sick or wounded. Considered somewhat of a miracle plant, Echinacea Augustifolia has a long history of being used to stave off illness, help heal wounds, and even treat snake bites.

Modern herbalists do not use it much differently. Studies have shown that it can indeed help fortify the immune system of some, and otherwise aid in preventing respiratory diseases and flu symptoms. Topically Echinacea Augustifolia is most frequently used in treating inflammation, wounds and abrasions and is still sometimes considered of use in treating snake bites.

 

2oz $2.95

$15.95

$1.95

Echinacea Purpurea, cut

Long known to Native Americans as a medicinal herb, it was originally used to treat a wide range of ailments, including coughs, colds, sore throats, and infections. Indeed, some tribes even went so far as to use the herb as a veterinary medicine. It grew in popularity with American settlers, becoming white spread in the American Medical practices, becoming the top selling herb in America by the early 1900s. And though popularity in America diminished after the advent of penicillin and other such medicines, it continued to be quite popular in Europe, particularly in Germany.

Today, it is still a particularly popular herbal remedy, with many herbalists using it to treat the common cold and flu, as well as alleviate symptoms associated with them such as a sore throat, cough, and fever. It is also said that Echinacea Purpurea is great for boosting the activity of the immune system, and in effect kick starting it into readiness at the early stages of illness or infection. Studies have found that it also contains substances that enhance the activity of the immune system, relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and have antiviral, and antioxidant effects. With such a wide range of applications, it is small wonder that herbalists frequently recommend Echinacea Purpurea for urinary tract infections, ear infections, athlete's foot, sinusitis, hay fever, slow healing wounds, and even vaginal yeast infections.

 

2oz $2.95

$14.95

$1.95

Eleutherococcus Powder

Eleuthecoccus Senticosus (or Siberian Ginseng) is a controversial herb that was originally compared to true Ginseng by Russian scientist I.I. Brekham. Brekham very much believed that Eleuthecoccus Senticosus would display many of the same properties for which Ginseng is famed, and widely publicized it as the a wonder supplement. Among its many believed qualities, Brekham considered Eleuthecoccus to be a superior adaptogen; an herb that allows the body and mind to readily adapt to outside sources of stress.

Though modern scientific study has left these qualities hotly debated, many herbalists still swear by the adaptogen qualities of Eleuthecoccus Senticosus. By these herbalists it is generally considered useful in helping the body to respond to illness, fatigue, and psychological stress, and thereby improve general health conditions.

 

2oz $3.95

$24.95

$2.95

Elder Berries

Elder Berries, or Sambucus nigra, are laden with numerous tales and stories throughout folklore and history, and are particularly linked to those legends and myths involving magic and spirits. Indeed, in English and Scandinavian folklore the belief was held that if you cut down the Elder tree a spirit known as the Elder Mother would be released to take her revenge upon the hapless wood cutter. This could only be avoided while chanting "Old girl, give me some of thy wood and I will give thee some of mine when I grow into a tree." Otherwise, Elder Berries are also held to be a powerful aid in warding off evil influence, as well as curses and spells intended to do harm. Shakespeare even wrote of it, speaking of it as a symbol of grief, perhaps due to many Christian beliefs that Judas was hung from an Elder Tree in his grief, as well as that the Cross of Calvary was made of Elder wood.

While many legends surround the wood, the berries themselves are still frequently utilized in making pies, jellies, and jams, as well as the occasional wine. Some herbalists also hold that Elderberries show potential in treating the symptoms of Influenza, with an extract created from the berry helping many recover in 2-3 days without many of the ill effects that result from many over-the-counter medications. Because of this, it is believe to stimulate the immune system and improve its ability to fight disease.

 

2oz $3.95

$19.95

$2.95

Elecampane Root, cut

Elecampane is also quite well known by its Latin name, Inula elenium, as well as its common names: Horse-Heal and Marchalm. The plant, widely grown for its medicinal purposes and even reportedly used as a condiment by the ancients, is discussed at length by ancient philosophers, doctors and even Poets. From these sources did it get its Latin name "Helenium," as it was said to have grown where Helen of Troy's tears had fallen. The Celts too held it as a sacred plant, calling it Elfwort (elf-herb), perhaps due to its qualities as an antiseptic which left it treasured as a magical healing herb.

previously prescribed for all manner of ailments, Elecampane is now primarily used only within the veterinary practice. Modern herbalists do however highly value Elecampane for its antiseptic qualities still, and will sometimes use it as an expectorant. It is also supposed to be quite valuable in treating those who are suffering from water retention. Elecampane should not be used by those who are pregnant.

 

--

$4.50

5lb $15.95

$ .95

Epson Salts

Traditionally a component of bath salts, Epsom Salts are well known for their aid in footbaths. However, also known as Hydrated Magnesium Sulfate, Epsom salts are also quite commonly used by Gardeners and Herbalists in correcting the magnesium deficiency that can sometimes be found in the soil of their gardens. This helps promote more healthy plant life, resulting in stronger plants that tend to be more productive than those that might grow in soil containing such a deficiency, if they grew at all. They are also used in flotation therapy, where they are used effect the density of water and therefore the buoyancy of whatever is placed in it; the salts added to the water help with flotation.

In medicine Epsom Salts are sometimes used as a component in a saline laxative when aiding with constipation. More commonly however it is used in baths to soothe aches and pains and improve coarse, rough skin. Some traditions also hold that it can be a great aid in poultices used to treat blemishes and acne. Similarly, the Salts are sometimes used in created a cream that is used for the removal of blackheads.

2oz $2.95

$11.95

$1.95

Eucalyptus Cut-

Also known as Eucalyptus globules, Blue Gum Tree, or Stringy Bark Tree, Eucalyptus was originally found in Australia and actually consists of 700 species of plants. After attracting the attention of numerous environmental and global development researches due to its fast growth, it can now be found all over the world as a rapidly growing wood whose oil can be used as a natural insecticide. Aboriginal traditions have long used Eucalyptus to heal wounds and treat fungal infections. Indeed, teas made of the leaves were also used to reduce fevers. In the 19th century it was also utilized in England to clean urinary catheters, with later studies showing that Eucalyptus has strong antibacterial properties. Some traditions of folklore also hold that it is a potent aid in the spiritual world, being of particular use in spells and rituals that involve healing and protection.

Modern herbalists view eucalyptus as a powerful antiseptic, using it sometimes as a gargle for treating numerous afflictions of the mouth and throat. When used locally, it can also sometimes be used to impair sensibility. Some also hold that the oil can be used as a potent expectorant, antiseptic, and even as a deodorant.

 

2oz $4.95

$29.95

$2.95

Eyebright, Powder

Known elsewhere as Euphrasia, Euphrasia officinalis, or the other common names of of Meadow eyebright and Red Eyebright, Eyebright has seen use for a long time, and has been mentioned numerous times within folk medicine. As one might imagine from the name, it is most commonly associated with the treatment of conditions of the eyes. Indeed, the name Euphrasia is of Greek origin, being derived from the Greek word Euphrosyne, which is word for Gladness, who was one of the three Graces who was known for her joy and mirth. The name is thought to be a play upon this, with the thought being that Eyebright (or Euphrasia) would bring gladness and joy to those who suffered from afflictions of the eyes. Spiritually, it has been used as a component to spells and rituals wherein you are seeking changes in perception and attitude, visionary experiences, and also as an aid in improving the memory.

In modern treatments, the focus of eyebright is still upon the eyes. There the folk medicine treatments still prevail, where it is used as a wash for the eyes, as well as a compress when the eyes are inflamed or irritated. It has also been used for conjunctivitis, belepharitis, tired eyes, styes, and numerous other such conditions.


4oz $4.95

 

$10.95

$1.95

Fennel Seed

Also known as Fenkel, Sweet Fennel, Wild Fennel and the Latin name of Foeniculum vulgare, Fennel was well known by the ancients and can be found in many sources of folklore. Among the Romans it was used for its aromatic fruits and edible shoots, and in medieval folklore it was said that snakes shed their skin near fennel plants, and ingest it to heal injuries to their eyes. In the mid-ages it was also ritually hung over doors on Midsummer's eve to ward off evil spirits, and it was viewed as a powerful protective force against witchcraft and evil influences. To this day it survives in similar tradition, and finds use in many traditions in spells and prayers of protection, seeking to prevent curses and possession, and otherwise ward off negative attention and energies.

Modern herbalists turn away somewhat from such schools of thought, and use it on occasion to eace flatulence in infants, or in treating colic or painful teething. Among adults, it is sometimes used with tea for similar purposes; reducing gas after meals or when it is otherwise chronic or painful. Fennel can also sometimes be used as a diuretic among adults, aiding in urinary problems. It has also found claim to uses in the veterinary field as well, often being set in kennels and stables to drive away fleas.

 

2oz $2.95

$7.95

$1.95

Fenugreek Seed Powder

Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds are a popular addition to a wide range of culinary dishes throughout the world. Most notable for their appearance within curry powders, pastes, and other Indian foods, they are also known to appear in varieties of Egyptian tea, and even as a flavoring agent for maple syrups within the US. In India, some herbalists also mix Fenugreek seeds with yogurt to create a rich hair conditioner.

In herbalists practice, Fenugreek seed has been found to be a fine supplement of a range of minerals and vitamins, and is known to include Protein, Vitamin C, niacin, and potassium. A variety of studies are also exploring the possibility that they might be useful in treating viruses, with some indication that it may possess antiviral properties that exhibited some ability to help fight the common cold.

 

2oz $3.95

$22.95

$2.95

Feverfew, cut

Feverfew is an herb that has long been held in medicinal folklore as possessing great healing virtues, and among these writings it can be found commonly under the names of Crysanthemum Parthenium, Tanacetum parthenium and Pyrethrum Parthenium. For these virtues, as well as its lovely flowers and the pleasant, citrus aroma that its leaves produce, it can often be found in old-styled gardens. As one might guess, Feverfews most common use in the traditions that speak of it is in reducing and treating fevers, but it is also known for being of fantastic aid in treating those who are afflicted with hysterical complaints, nervousness, low spirits, and a wide variety of other forms of anxiety. Folklore holds that it can also be applied to coughs, wheezing, difficult breathing, and even the sting and swelling of insect bites.

In modern treatment, it is still much used in reducing fever, but also has seen newer applications as a treatment for headaches, arthritis, and digestive problems. It has also recently emerged in commercial cosmetics, utilized in lotions and other such products where it is used to calm red and irritated skin. Some herbalists also hold that it has a calming effect, perhaps related to the treatments of old, which allows Feverfew to also be used as a sleep aid.


2oz $6.95

$45.95

$3.95

Five Finger Grass

This herb with numerous associations with mystical and spiritual traditions is known by a wide variety of names that can be found in numerous sources of literature concerning Wicca, and Hoodoo among other traditions. Within these texts and publications, it can be found listed as Cinquefoil, Cramweed, Five Finger Blossom, Five Fingers, Goosegrass, Goose Tansy, Moor Grass, Pentaphylon, Silver Sinquefoil, Silverweed, Sunkfield, and Synkefoyle, so as you can imagine, there is sometimes a great deal of confusion regarding the herb and its uses. With leaves that come to five points, it is sometimes associated with the mystical properties of the pentagram, as well as five of the qualities that people most often seek in their lives, with those being love, money, health, power and wisdom. As such, it is often used in spells seeking financial gain, or by those who are otherwise seeking good fortune and self improvement. Among Hoodoo practitioners, it is sometimes carried in Mojo Bags specifically to bring love, money, health, power, and wisdom into their lives. In other traditions, it is also used to repel evil and negativity, particularly that which is caused by "the five fingers of man."

Outside of spiritual and mystical uses, Five Finger Grass has also been applied to medicinal uses as well. In this case, it has found great use in treating fevers and lowering them, as well as aiding in the treatment of diarrhea, to help prevent dehydration and other such further complication that can result.

 

4oz $2.95

$6.95

$1.95

Flax Seed

Flax, also known as Linseed or Linum usitatissimum, has originated as a widespread crop throughout the Mediterranean, spreading from the Greek world all the way to India. A famed crop, particularly in Egypt, it has been used in the creation of linen for up to 5000 years. In antiquity, it was also so common and popular as to have been portrayed on the walls of temples and tombs in Thebes, where it was illustrated as a flowering plant. Indeed, the very use of flax for the purpose of creating linen is believed to date well beyond the written history of man, going so far back as the Neolithic period. Spiritually, perhaps due to the wealth brought in by the crop and the wellbeing it could provide to a community, Flax has long seen use in rituals prayers and spells that are seeking prosperity and healing, as well as protection.

In more modern study, flax has been shown to contain lignan and Omega-3 fatty acid. With the result being that flax seed may be of great benefit to the heart, helping to lower cholesterol, as well as lowering blood triglyceride and blood pressure levels. Flax has also shown of late to possibly possess anti-cancer properties, with some studies showing that they have aided in reducing the growth of certain types of tumors. Some recent studies have also shown that flax seed oil can aid in treating Crohn's Disease and Colitis, where it helps to heal the inner lining of inflamed intestines.

 

2oz $3.95

$21.95

$2.95

Fo-Ti Root Powder

Native to China, Fo-Ti root (Polygonum multiflorum) has been known to Traditional Chinese Medicine for ages. Indeed, its common Chinese name, He Shou Wu (translating into Black haired Mr. He) refers to a Chinese legend that describes an elderly herbalist who used Fo-ti root and in so doing had his grey hair restored to black and his youthful vigor returned. Though perhaps an exaggeration of the truth, the legend does not stray too far from the benefits of the root which can help the aged maintain their vigor and health.

Modern study has shown that it can aid in lowering serum cholesterol levels and even decrease the hardening of arteries. Fo-Ti root has also displayed some ability to improve immune function. Experimentation and further study are also exploring the possibilities of improving stamina and insomnia, and otherwise treating Parkinson's Disease and memory loss.

 

1oz $2.95

$22.95

$2.95

Galangal Root, cut (Lo John)

Also known as chewing John, Little John, and Alpina galangal, Galangal has long been used in a wide variety of oriental cuisines, and in its raw form it offers a smell that is quite reminiscent of citrus, with rich hints of pine. Throughout Southeastern Asia it can also be used as a component in a tonic, often mingled with lemon juice, for the treatment of coughs and throat ailments. Perhaps more famously to those of the Western world, Galangal has come to be known as Low John in Hoodoo practices, where it is often carried in a mojo bag or otherwise used in spiritual ritual and spells to find aid in winning court cases, increasing your wealth, and break and protect from hexes and curses. Less commonly, it can also be found used in spells seeking to increase psychic potency or those rituals and spells involving sexual magic.

Outside of spiritual practices, Galangal is still most commonly found today used in South Eastern Asia as a culinary herb, most famously perhaps in Tom Yum Soup as well as Dtom Kha gai. Medicinally, the folk remedy where it is used as a tonic still holds to be the most common treatment, where it is still used throughout South East Asia to treat coughs and colds when blended with lemon juice.


2oz $2.95

$14.95

$1.95

Garlic, powder

Also found under its lesser known Latin name, Allium satirum, Garlic is closely related to shallots, leeks, and chives, is perhaps most commonly known for its use in the culinary arts, where it is notorious for causing bad breath despite its widespread popularity for the taste that it lends to a dish. Historically however, it is also quite well known for its medicinal applications, with records dating back thousands of years to its use in medicine. Indeed, the famed philosopher Pliny even cited it as the "rustic's cure-all," as many thought it to be an aid in reducing most any disease's symptoms. Known globally, it was even venerated in Korea, where it is said that the gods gave garlic to women to provide them with supernatural power as and immortality, while in Greece and Rome, it was placed at crossroads in offering to Hecate. Today, it survives spiritually and is still used in spell and ritual with many legends and writings referring to its ability to repel evil curses and magic, a legend that only grew with its inclusion as a vampire-bane in Bram Stoker's Dracula.

In modern uses, some claim that Garlic can be a great aid in heart disease and cancer, with early studies showing possible cardio vascular benefits, though there is still some debate and controversy around the subject. It is also frequently seen as a preventative aid against the common cold, or as an expectorant for coughs, and in both of the World Wars it was used as an antiseptic. Around this time, it was also even used to aid in treating small pox, tuberculosis, and other such traumatic diseases.

 

2oz $3.95

$16.95

$2.95

Ginkgo Leaf, cut

Also known as yin xing, Ginkgo biloba or the Maidenhair Tree, Ginkgo is one of the best known examples of a living fossil. The modern plant has been shown to have deviated little from found fossil remains, appearing much the same now as it did in times before man. Long thought extinct in the wild it was recently found growing wild in Zhejing, a province in Eastern China, though there is some debate to this as well,a s some argue that the ginkgo trees were planted and preserved by Chinese Monks over a period of 1000 years. While it is easy to get lost in the fascinating history of the herb's growth and evolution (or lack thereof), one should also note that the herb has long been used in a wide variety of culinary dishes throughout Asia, and that one can now find it within such cuisine globally.

Modern studies have also shown that the herb is quite useful in treating dementia, and possible even in prevention of the onset of Alzheimer's. Other studies, though wracked with conflicting results, have also shown that Ginkgo can help alleviate allergies, reduce inflammation, and possibly even aid in the treatment of cancer as an anti-tumor treatment. Elsewhere, it has also been shown to aid in treating male impotency, where the chief cause is impaired blood circulation to the involved tissues.

 

2oz $2.95

$14.95

$1.95

Ginseng Powder (Siberian)

Not actually related to Chinese Ginseng, Siberian Ginseng, or Eleutherococcus senticosus, derives its name from original studies that compared it to the wonders of that other herb. These original studies were reported to show that Siberian Ginseng could function much the same way as the Chinese variety, boosting energy in mind and body and otherwise helping the body and mind respond to stress, trauma and fatigue. Spiritually, this is generally believed to improve vigor and lend aid to love and healing spells.

Though modern studies have left Siberian Ginseng a subject of debate and controversy, many herbalists generally believe that Siberian Ginseng can help the body deal with physically and mentally stressing situations and exposure, much as the Chinese variety. This includes helping to resist fatigue from heat and cold exposure, illness, and other environmental factors.

 

1oz $3.95

$40.95

$3.95

Glucosamine Sulfate Powder

Widely prescribed for arthritis throughout Europe, Glucosamine Sulfate is widely sold in the US as a dietary supplement. Derived from the chitin of shellfish, it is a dietary supplement that is rapidly gaining in popularity. This is in part because it has notably less side effects when compared to the Cox-2 inhibitors or NSATDs that are often prescribed for the same purpose.

Glucosamine Sulfate is generally prescribed to help rehabilitate cartilage and reduce the progression of osteoarthritis. In general, it is quite useful reducing joint pain and as such is offered as an option for those suffering from arthritis. It should be noted that you should not use Glucosamine Sulfate powder if allergic to shell fish. Consult a doctor before use if pregnant or nursing.

 

1oz $4.95

$57.95

$4.95

Glutamine L Powder

Glutamine L power is actually an amino acid that can be found in high quantities throughout the body. Scientists generally classify it as a conditionally essential Amino acid, as it is not absolutely necessary for sustenance, though Glutamine L is quite important for protein synthesis. The amino acid is also supports a wide range of other cellular functions.

As a dietary supplement, Glutamine L Powder is popularly used to help improve muscle metabolism and recovery rate, making it quite useful for those who regularly take part in intensive physical exercise. It is also explored by some as being useful in helping to maintain the function of the gastro intestinal tract.

 

1oz $2.95

$27.95

$2.95

Glysine Powder

Glycine powder consists of the most chemically simple of all of the amino acids, and it is most commonly prescribed as a sleep aid. It has a notable calming effect on the brain, helping with anxious or frantic thoughts and otherwise helping to find sleep and otherwise seems to lack most of the groggy side effects found in many other sleep aids.

For these reasons, Glycine powder is perhaps most commonly prescribed as a treatment for insomnia. Clinical studies have indicated that it is quite useful in helping those with sleeping difficulties find better rest. Some studies are also exploring the Glycine powder as a possible antibacterial agent that would be useful in treating gastric ulcers.

 

2oz $4.95

$30.95

$2.95

Goat's Rue Powder

Also known as French Lilac, French Honeysuckle, Holy Hay and Italian Fitch, Goat's Rue (galega officinalis) is a flowering plant native to southern Europe and western Asia. Interestingly it exhibits little actual scent until it has been damaged or bruised, at which point it exudes a notably unpleasant aroma. Though it was utilized for medicine since ancient times, it was perhaps most notably recognized for its medicinal qualities in the 1800's, when french doctors recognized in a study that it could increase the milk yield of livestock substancially.

Within modern practice, Goat's Rue is recognized both as a diaphoretic and diuretic, and because of this is sometimes used to reduce fevers. Its properties as a galactagogue also make it a popular choice among herbalists for helping to increase milk flow for nursing mothers, and occasionally improving digestion. Studies for non-insulin dependent diabetes have also revealed that Goat's Rue can help lower sugar levels.

 

1/2 oz $6.95

$188.95

$12.95

Goldenseal Root, cut

Golden Seal is a popular herb that has a long history of medicinal use. Beginning with the Native Americans, Golden Seal was used to treat skin disorders, digestive problems, liver conditions, and even eye irritation. Early documentation also suggests that the Cherokee applied it to the treatment and cure of some cancers as well. This led to Golden Seal becoming popular during the 1800's, particularly in the treatment of assorted illnesses of the stomach, with some also regarding it as somewhat of a magical cure for cancer before these treatment methods fell out of popularity.

Modern usage of Goldenseal by herbalists tends to revolve around the fact that it is quite useful in treating infections of mucus membranes, such as the mouth, the sinuses, the throat, the intestines, the stomach, and so on. It can also be used in treating minor wounding and fungal infections of the skin. Goldenseal should not be used by those who are pregnant or experience high blood pressure.

 

2oz $2.95

$15.95

$1.95

Gota Kola Powder

Gota Kola (Centella asiatica) has been used for thousands of years in India, China, and Indonesia for culinary purposes. Though perhaps best known for use in Sri Lankan food, where it is traditionally accompanying rice and curry, Gota Kola is also well known to traditional medicine of the regions as well. Indeed, you may also here it referred to as the Fountain of Life, due to an old legend where a Chinese herbalists was said to have lived 200 years with the aid of the herb.

A mild adaptogen, Gota Kola is sometimes imbibed as an afternoon stimulant where it helps to overcome fatigue and other such factors. Reports have also indicated that it may be useful in helping heal wounds and sores, and it has been a traditional aid in treating Leprosy throughout its native regions. Various studies have also been explored in which Gota Kola has been used to treat anxiety and hypertension.

 

1oz $2.95

$34.95

$2.95

Grains of Paradise Seed

Found also under its Latin name of Aframomum melegueta, or the more common names of Melegueta Pepper, Alligator Pepper, and Guinea grains or Guinea Pepper, Grains of Paradise was quite popular in medieval Europe. There, it was frequently used as a substitute for black pepper, particularly during the 14th and 15th centuries, when it was most commonly used in this fashion in the larger population centers of Europe, particularly in Northern France. After this period, people largely stopped using Grains of Paradise in cooking practices, generally leaving it alone unless it was to spice sausages or add to the flavor of beer or gin, though it was taken up by medieval herbalists and doctors as a popular healing agent, and was regarded as a particularly useful treatment for the Humours. In African lore the seeds of Grains of Paradises are also regarded as a spice possessing magical properties, and are frequently spoken of as being of great value for spells of divination as well as rituals intended to determine guilt.

In more modern culture, Grains of Paradise is rapidly becoming a popular spice in the culinary world once more, and has been featured as an ingredient by famous chefs and is featured as a flavoring agent in popular beers. Some have also turned to it within certain diets, such as the raw-food diet, as an alternative to Black Pepper and other such spices. This is due to the fact that Grain Of Paradise is generally less harsh to the digestive track than those spices, while providing a very similar flavor.

 

2oz $3.95

$22.95

$2.95

Grapefruit Peel Powder

Historically only 300 years old, Grapefruit is actually quite the young fruit all things considered. It is said to been created in the combination of a Pomelo and a Sweet Orange but there is no conclusive evidence about its origins to support this theory. While the name might suggest similarity to the Grape, it is actually a citrus fruit with more In common with an orange or lemon, and has been named for the way in which it hangs in clusters like a bunch of grapes.

While most commonly thrown away, the peel of a Grapefruit is known to possess a wide range of useful properties. It is often added to herbal soaps and creams as an exfoliating agent. It is also known to possess antioxidant and antibacterial qualities. Some herbalists will also prescribe Grapefruit Peel for helping to maintain artery health.

 

1oz $2.95

$30.95

$2.95

Grapeseed Powder

An extract taken from the seeds of Grapes, grapeseed powder is often used both in herbal medicine as a dietary supplement as well as within a range of cosmetic products. It is perhaps most commonly found in modern usage within natural soaps and scrubs, wherein it is used as an ingredient to add texture and color. Another common usage for Grapeseed powder is to help with exfoliation in facials and cleansers, where it is intended to help keep skin looking younger and to prevent premature aging.

Within modern herbal practice, Grapeseed powder is sometimes used as an anti-inflammatory agent. It is also being explored for its antioxidant qualities, and it commonly prescribed as a supplement rich in antioxidants.

 

1oz $2.95

$30.95

$2.95

Graviola Powder

A graviola (annona muricata) is actually a small evergreen tree native to rainforests and tropical regions within the Americas. These small tress produce hear-shaped fruit known for their yellow skin and white flesh within. This fruit is popularly used to make a popular drink in Brazil, while the leaves and stems have been popularized within herbal medicine, and are frequently used to make Graviola powder.

Within herbal practices, clinical studies have taken place that demonstrate Graviola powder can aid in relieving depression. It is also traditionally used as an antispasmodic and a sedative that can help stimulate digestion. There has also been some research regarding the use of Graviola powder in fighting tumor growth and cancer, though no conclusive results have yet been achieved. Graviola Powder should not be used if you are pregnant.

 

1oz $3.95

$32.95

$3.95

Grindelia Tops, cut

Grindelia (Grindelia squarrosa) enters modern herb lore through the introduction of its use by Native Americans, who used it to treat bronchial and skin problems. This included the treatment of allergic reactions, such as those exhibited in contact to poison ivy. It was recognized by orthodox medical practice during the 19th century but fell out of favor as medical trends strayed from herbal practice.

Many herbalists still employ Grindelia tops however. As an expectorant and an antispasmodic, it is sometime used to treat such problems as chronic bronchitis and more serious illness such as emphysema. Topically, it is used on occasion to heal the skin after irritation or burn.

 

2oz $3.95

$29.95

$2.95

Guarana Seed Powder

Native to the Amazon Basin, we often hear of Guarana Seeds (Paullinia Cupana) in reference to energy drinks and similar such products. This is no doubt due to the fact that Guarana seeds contain twice the caffeine found in coffee beans. Outside of this commercial use, Guarana is also important to Tupi and Guarani culture, in Paraguay. These tribes believe that a vengeful god killed a beloved village child. A goodly god then took the eyes from the child and used one to create wild Guarana and the other to create domesticated Guarana, explaining the way the fruit looks like an eye when split open.

Guarana is most frequently used in carbonated soft drinks or herbal teas as a quick energy boost. However, it has been explored as a substance that can help improve memory retention, physical endurance, alertness, and improve mood.

 

1oz $3.95

$39.95

$3.95

Guggul Resin Powder

Guggul Resin (Commiphora mukul) has been a popular medicine within Ayurvedic Medicine for centuries. Within this, spiritual practices, and simply to scent the air, Guggul resin has also been widely used as an incense and is often favored for its scent which seems to blend spicy notes with the sweeter aroma of vanilla. This has resulted in it also being known as Common Myrrh, or False Myrrh as well as Guggul Resin also being used within the perfume industry.

<>In Ayurvedic practice it is occasionally used for aromatherapy but also to increase metabolism and otherwise improve the fat-burning activity of the body. Studies have also shown that it can lower cholesterol as well, helping to reduce risk of heart disease and strokes.

 

2oz $3.95

$22.95

$2.95

Gymnema Sylvestris Powder

Gymnema Sylvestris is a vine-like herb most commonly found within the tropical forests of central and Southern India, where it is also commonly known as Gudmar (Sugar Destroyer in Hindi), or even Miracle Fruit. It is noted for being a large climbing vine that can have a rather sweepingly large expanse. It has been part of Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years, where it is used to treat diabetes and other sugar-based ailments.

Herbalists and Ayurvedic practitioners widely prescribe Gymnema Sylvestris to reduce sugar levels. It is also sometimes used to encourage weight loss, as it can even reduce the taste of sugar and make it less appealing. Some studies have also shown that Gymnema Sylvestris can be used in reducing total cholesterol. Topically, some herbalists will also use Gymnema as an anti-inflammatory.

 

2oz $2.95

$15.95

$1.95

Hawthorn Berries, whole

Known as Mayblossom, the Bread and Cheese Tree, Ladies Meat, Whitethorn, and it's formal Latin name of Crataegus Pinnatifida, Hawthorn was formerly regarded as sacred, with the belief that it was used to create the Crown of Thorns that was said to be placed upon Christ's brow. Some folk also believed that it still bears the unpleasant aromas of the Great Plague of London, with the plant actually possessing the same fragrance of decay. This aroma attributed to the plant is said to attract the carrion insects that nest in it, and aid in fertilizing the plant though whether this is true lends to some debate. Also quite popular in marking hedgerows that were used to demonstrate the boundaries of farmland, in the 19th century some researches began using the Hawthorn berries in the treatment of heart conditions.

Today, this research as to the treatment of heart conditions has expanded a great deal. Hawthorn Berries are now often used to promote a healthy cardiovascular system, and are often used in the treatment of high blood pressure, congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmia. The berries have also been found to aid in strengthening the heart and blood vessels. There is also some evidence indicative that they are helpful in the treatment of blood clots and the restoration of the heart muscle wall, with other evidence showing it to be quite effective in lowering cholesterol. Use in Europe of these purposes has become widespread, with the berries frequently seeing use in treatment of the early stages of heart disease, for which it is endorsed and approved by the German Government.

 

2oz $2.95

$14.95

$1.95

Hibiscus Flower, whole

Also found under the names of Rosemallow and Flor De Jamaica, HibiscusFlowers, or Hibiscus sabdariffa, are well known for their showy blossoms that are often found as part of shrubs in gardens around the world. Beyond this cosmetic use, Hibiscus flowers can also be found put to use in a great many ways globally, ranging from use as a vegetable in culinary dishes to paper making. In Mexico, it is often found in a drink called Agua de Flor De Jamaica, which is popular for its color and flavor (which is said to be similar to cranberry juice), as well as for the actual consumption of the dried flowers, which are held as a delicacy. Elsewhere it is frequently used as an herbal tea which is held to be relaxing. In spiritual practices throughout the world Hibiscus flowers are associated with love and are said to be quite potent an aphrodisiac, as well as being useful in spells and rituals to attract love and lust. In some traditions it is also held to be a potent aid in divination and dream magic, particularly where you are seeking love.

Modern medicine has also turned an eye upon the flower, conducting a study in 2008 that showed that the traditional hibiscus flower tea can be quite helpful in lowering blood pressure in pre-hypertensive and mildly hypertensive patients. In this way it can be quite good at soothing nerves. It has also been suggested that the tea can be used as an antispasmodic as well, though further study needs to be conducted.

 

1oz $7.95

$105.95

$7.95

High John

Known under the latin name of ipomoea jalapa, the root is more commonly named after John the Conqueror (or John the Conqueroo as he is sometimes called), who is spoken of often in African American folklore and is frequently considered to be quite magically potent, particularly among Hoodoo traditions. Also known as Bindweed or Jalap Root to some, it is actually related to the morning glory and the sweet potato, and you can see some resemblance in the general shape of the tuber. Most frequently, High John Root is used as part of a Mojo bag. There it is said to provide good luck and the strength to help overcome obstacles; as well as provide potent protection from the negative energies and curses of others. Another common usage of the Root is within spells of a sexual nature, where it is said to be quite potent in drawing the attentions of the one you desire. It has been written of and referenced for these purposes by numerous famous Blues singers, including Willie Dixon, Muddy Waters, and Bo Diddley, making it quite the iconic among that community and culture.

Modern herbalists and Hoodoo practitioners typically use it externally; in most cases avoiding its internal use as when it is taken orally it produces strong laxative properties, that are best avoided unless the situation warrants it.

 

2oz $3.95

$33.95

$3.95

Hops Flower, whole

Known worldwide as one of the chief ingredients in the brewing of beer, Hops (Humulus Lupulus) is grown throughout the world primarily to sate the thirst of beer-lovers everywhere. Hops was first known to be used within the creation of beer around the 11th century, but prior to this it was a popular addition to the alcoholic beverage Ale, which was favored by Saxon and Danish cultures. It was also a popular medicinal herb prior to the surge in its use in creating beer, with many herbalists of past ages using it to treat a variety of disorders, primarily as a sedative. Within this it was also frequently decried as an herb that could inspire depression and melancholy, and was said by some to shorten the life as an additive to beer and other drinks.

Herbalists today still recognize that hops can be used as a sedative. Just as old the "flower" is sometimes dried and crushed and used to help create a tea for this purpose. Old herbals also speak of it being a fantastic sleep aid when used as such, that is also of use in treating nervousness, delirium, and, interestingly, inflammation. As a diuretic it is also sometimes used in treating bladder problems and disorders.

 

2oz $2.95

$18.95

$1.95

Horehound, cut

Valued by the Romans for its medicinal properties, Horehound's very Latin name, Marrubium vulgare, is said to be derived from the ancient town of Italy, Maria Urbs. Others debate this however, citing that it comes from Marrob, the Hebrew word for "bitter juice." This argument is supported by the belief that Horehound is one of the bitter herbs that the Jews partake of during the feast of Passover. Also known among Egyptian Priests, Horehound can be found referred to by them as Seeds of Horus, Bull's Blood, and the Eye of the Star. Among these cultures it was often attributed with anti venom properties, and was thought to be a powerful aid against poisons, serpent stings, and even the "Mad dogge's biting" which one can only assume to be Rabies. It was also considered to be a powerful herb that nullifies magic, and, conversely, is sometimes used to maintain mental clarity in lengthy and taxing rituals.

Today, Horehound is more commonly known for its long attributed ability to treat lung ailments and coughs. Also, in large doses it is said to be useful as a gentle laxative or even as a vermifuge (an agent that can aid in expelling worms and other animal parasites). Some herbalists also lay claim to the idea that Horehound can be useful in treating the common cold. This is probably in part due to its ability to aid in the treatment of coughs and other such symptoms.

 

2oz $4.95

$23.95

$2.95

Horny Goat Weed Powder

Known under a variety of whimsical names that include Rowdy Lamb Herb, Barrenwort, Bishops Hat, Fairy Wings, and Yin Yang Huo, Horny Goat Weed has existed within lore and medicine for hundreds of years. Originating in China, the legend holds that a humble goat herded first came to understand its medicinal qualities when his goats stumbled upon a patch and, after eating it, experienced a sharp increase in sexual activity. Ever since it has been a popular aphrodisiac within Traditional Chinese Medicine, wherein it is largely believed to increase sexual desire, fertility, and sexual sensation. Healing practices within the traditional Chinese medicine also used it for kidney, liver, and joint disorders.

More modernly, Horny Goat Weed is most commonly found in sexual enhancement supplements. Within this, and among herbalists, it is widely known for its ability to increase fertility and sexual desire in men, and improve sexual sensation within both sexes. While there are no known severe long term hazards for taking Horny Goat Weed, extended use can occasionally result in dizziness, nausea, and nosebleed.

 

1oz $2.95

$26.95

$2.95

Horse Chestnut Powder

Native to South Eastern Europe, Horse Chestnut (Aesculus Hippocastanum) is cultivated now within Europe and the US as an ornamental plant. This is largely due to the white flowers that bloom on its branches, followed by the appearance of green-brown fruits. It was first observed as being used by the Turks to treat respiratory problems within their horses, which likely resulted in the modern name. Interestingly, within European folk medicine it was used to ward off and cure arthritis by carrying it on one's person. Separately, Native Americans began using it similarly, carrying it on their person to ward off rheumatism.

In modern herbal practice, Horse Chestnut powder is still used as an anti-inflammatory to treat arthritis and rheumatism. It has also been validated as an expectorant, and is often used to treat respiratory ailments.

 

1oz $2.95

$27.95

$2.95

Hydrangea Root Powder

Hydrangea is actually a genus of flower whose name is actually born of the Greek word for Water Basin. This variety, Hydrangea arborescens, is perhaps most commonly known as "Annabell" and can be found sprawled across the Eastern Unitied states. The Cherokee were rported to have first observed the uses of the herb as medicinal within North America while Traditional Chinese Medicine had explored it as well. Old English spiritual traditions held that Hydrangeas could make women unlucky in love, and curse them to spinsterhood if it was planted outside their homes.

Within folk medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine, Hydrangeas are frequently used as a diuretic to ease the pain of kidney stones' passing as well as other disorders and difficulties of the bladder such as inflammation of the prostate or bladder infections. It has also been associated with relieving chest pain in cases of chronic bronchitis.

 

2oz $2.95

$17.95

$1.95

Hyssop, cut

Widely known as an ingredient in men's cologne or as a component in the French liquor of Chartreuse, Hyssop, or Agastache rupestris in Latin, is also used to produce the green coloring for which Absinthe is famous. Also within the culinary arts, it is sometimes used to add a bitter, minty flavor to soups. Outside of the culinary field, Hyssop is perhaps most famed for its repeated mention in the Old Testament, where it is written of frequently as part of rituals, particularly in seeking the protection of God. Perhaps the most famous example of this would be where it was said to be used in painting the doors where Hebrew families dwelled to protect them from Moses' plague that claimed every firstborn son of Egypt. Hyssop was also said to be used by the priests of the Temple of Solomon for purification and protection rites; a tradition that lives on among Catholic priests, who use it in the ceremonial aspergillum that they use to sprinkle holy water.

More modern herbalists portray Hyssop as an expectorant, which can be quite useful in treating coughs and other such illnesses of the lungs. It has also been shown to be a diaphoretic, used in the stimulation of sweating, and a carminative, used for expelling gas from the stomach and intestines to help relieve abdominal pain or flatulence. Hyssop is also frequently used in combination with Horehound for these purposes.

 

2oz $3.95

$27.95

$2.95

Jasmine Flowers, whole

Jasmine, or Jasminum officinale, whose name is derived from the Persian word "yasmin," meaning Gift from God, is quite commonly cultivated in gardens and as a houseplant. Revered for its fragrance, it is also quite well known for the fact that its flowers open their petals at night. In China, it is used for tea, often with a green or oolong tea base. It can take hours to absorb the fragrance and flavor into the water, and the process is repeated as many as seven times for the highest quality of teas. In the Philippines, it is used to create a garland that is used to adorn and decorate religious images while in other parts of Asia, Jasmine has also seen use in wedding ceremonies. Perhaps under a similar ideal as these religious practices, Jasmine has also seen long use in spells and rituals, particularly when seeking to attract love and prosperity; sometimes used in divination, particularly in the use of dream magic. In other mystical use, Jasmine flowers are also said to be great for use in charging quartz crystals with soothing energy.

In Chinese alternative medicine, Jasmine flowers are sometimes used to "cool down" blood. Studies have also shown Jasmine to possess strong antiviral and antibacterial properties, making it a popular supplement used in the treatment of colds and other such ailments as well.

 

1 flower $3.95

6 flowers $17.95

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Jericho Flower

Selaginella lepidophylla, also known as the Rose of Jericho, the Resurrection Flower, or Jericho Flowers, are so named as they seem to come to life after they die. They survive, curled up dormant and brown and appear to the untrained eye to be dead for years. Once it comes into contact with water that it can find nutrients in, however, it expands and turns green, springing to life and blooming before curling back up when the water is depleted. This cycle can last for years and years, and has given rise to the tradition of keeping one dormant in one's home and bringing it out around Christmas time. During this time, it is watered, and brought to life before it is allowed again to wither with the passing of the holiday. This is said to symbolize Mary's delivery of Christ, and the plant used in this tradition is often passed down through the family over the years.

Outside of Christmas traditions, it is most commonly used in spiritual practices, where it is said to have particular use in love spells, either where one is seeking to bring to life a love that died or create love where there previously was not any. Some herbalists also attribute the Jericho Flower with the ability to purify blood, often helping to ease the symptoms of illnesses and fevers.

 

4oz $3.95

$9.95

$1.95

Jezebel Root, Pieces

Jezebel root is perhaps most commonly known to Hoodoo and other pagan and occult tradition. Reportedly related to the Iris flower, it has on occasion been confused with Queen Elizabeth Root, which is also of the same family. In the oldest practices in which it is known, Jezebel Root is famed for its part in a curse, known commonly as The Curse of Jezebel, which is performed with an elaborate ritual and is used to cause distress in the life of one's enemy. It is also well known in older lore as a root of particular boon to prostitutes. For them it was held that the root possessed magical properties that would aid greatly in attracting wealthy customers.

Today, Jezebel root is primarily utilized in Hoodoo and other traditions, where still lays claim to its role in the famed Curse of Jezebel. Its other uses have expanded into people of other vocations however, particularly among those who rely upon tips from men to supplement their income, particularly among waitresses, hair dressers, and other such vocations.

 

2oz $2.95

$35.95

$2.95

Jiaogulan Powder

Jiaogulan (Gynostemma Pentaphyllum) is a plant found throughout Asia, but seems to have been only documented as being used both as a dietary supplement and for medicinal purposes in China. Indeed, though documentation in China dates back to the 1400s, it wasn't until the 1800s that it was truly recognized by traditional Chinese Medicine. And even then Jiogulan was still rather isolated in its use, being popular mostly within a relatively small portion of Southern China. There, it was commonly imbibed within an herbal tea instead of the more common Green tea, and earned itself the nickname of the "Immortality Herb," due to the long lives that people of the region lived.

This nickname is perhaps well earned as Jiaogulan's healing properties have been increasingly uncovered in research concerning its many beneficial properties. Being both an adaptogen and an antioxidant, it is quite comparable to Ginseng in quality, helping to regulate blood pressure, lower cholesterol, and improve endurance. Some have also reported a calming effect, and indicated that Jiaogulan can be used as an anti inflammatory, or even as an expectorant for cough and cold.

 

2oz $3.95

$19.95

$2.95

Juniper Berries, whole

Not actually true berries, Juniper Berries are actually fleshy, merged scales similar to pine needles that possess a berry-like appearance, coming from the Juniperus communis, or Common Juniper. Perhaps most commonly known for their culinary use, Juniper Berries have long been used in European and Scandinavian cuisine to flavor meat dishes, particularly wild birds and game meats. Within these regions, the Berries can also be found as a seasoning for pork, cabbage and sauerkraut. Juniper Berries are also widely known as the agent used to add flavor to Gin. Ancient Greeks used them for medicine, often using the Berries to increase their stamina before the Olympic Games. Romans also used them as a cheap, domestic substitute for black pepper and long pepper, both of which they had to import from India. In spiritual practices, Juniper berries can also be found in attracting good and healthy energies, particularly where you are seeking love and protection.

As a note of interest to more modern herbal practices, the addition of Juniper Berries to gin was originally intended for medicinal purposes, with the intent to use it as an agent for delivering the medicinal properties of Juniper Berries. Modern herbalists still often see the Berries as being useful as a diuretic, helping to purge the system of toxins and aid the digestive tract, as well as an appetite stimulant. Others also hold that it is a useful remedy for rheumatism and arthritis.

 

1oz $3.95

$46.95

$3.95

Kava Kava Root, powder

This ancient crop of the western Pacific, also known as Piper methysticum, has long been used to help those who imbibe it relax, without interrupting their mental clarity. Traditionally, it has been prepared by chewing, grinding or pounding the root before adding it to water in which it is then consumed. Among the Vanuata, it was imbibed before dinner, so that all involved would have help in relaxing and being at ease. In Fiji, it was an ingredient in a drink called "grog" that is still popular among young men, who drink it and gather for the telling of stories and general relaxation. Among natives, it is said to be of great use when seeking metnal clarity and patience, as well as when seeking ease of acceptance, relaxed muscles, and a general sense of well being. Spiritually, it has been used to induce visions, and is said to increase the potency of spell work involving astral travel.

Modern usage of Kava Kava root typically involves the root being powdered, where it is added in varying amounts to water, depending on the desired potency. In this, one can find that it is often mixed with coconut water or milk, lemon grass, cocoa, sugar, or soy milk to add to the flavor and ease of consumption. The purpose of this drink clings close to its original roots, often being designed to aid in finding clarity and peace of mind and a general state of calmness, mind and body.

 

3oz $1.95

$9.95

$1.95

Kelp Granules

This large variety of seaweed has seen use in most cultures and regions throughout the world. In some European regions, it was quite commonly used in soap and glass production, with Kelp being burned to create the soda ash that was used in such production methods. In the Pacific, Kelp is quite important to Japanese cuisine, and is often used to flavor broths and stews, as well as a stand-alone vegetable or a garnish. It can also be found in Japan as a main ingredient to a wide range of snack products. Imbued with high concentrations of iodine, Kelp was also often used in medieval times to treat the growth of goiters, which can develop from the thyroid gland when a person is experiencing a lack of iodine in their diet.

More modernly, Kelp can be found in a much wider array of products. In some circles it is used as a favored salt substitute, and is used as an addition to cosmetic baths where it is said to tone, hydrate and help clear skin. It is also quite frequently found in a wide array of health food supplements, as it is a rich source of natural vitamins and minerals. Indeed, Kelp has been found to contain Magnesium, Calcium, Phosphorus, Iron, Potassium, 12 vitamins (including A, B1, B2, C, D and E), 21 amino acids, 60 minerals and true elements, and as studies have revealed it is particularly rich in Iodine and Vitamin E.

 

2oz $2.95

$15.95

$1.95

Kola Nut Powder

Native to rainforests of Africa, Kola Nut (cola nitida) offers an enjoyable, albeit bitter, flavor that has resulted in it sometimes being chewed by a variety of indigenous cultures to West Africa, both singularly and as a social activity. This is popular among some circles of Muslim men who will chew the nuts rather than imbibing alcohol - a practice disallowed by their faith. Kola Nut is also part of a ceremonial tradition where it is given to tribal chieftains as a gift. Despite this rich traditional background, Kola nut is almost certainly best known as the flavoring agent and source of caffeine for many cola-flavored soft drinks.

Herbalists also explore the qualities of Kola Nut as a natural enhancement supplement. Studies have shown that it can aid in increasing alertness, improving physical energy, elevate moods, suppress appetite, and even increase tactile senses.

 

4oz $1.95

$5.95

$ .95

Kosher Salt

While those of us in the US widely know this variety of salt as Kosher Salt, throughout the UK is is known as Koshering Salt, which is perhaps a more apt name for the product. The salt is quite similar to common table salt, but typically possesses larger granules and contains no other additives. It gets its name from the fact that it is used to help create kosher meats, helping to extract blood from meat. If the finer grains of common table salt were applied to this purpose it is much more likely that table salt would dissolve during the process, doing little more than creating a very salty meat. This process is used to help meet the dietary rules set by Jewish law, and is intended to draw blood from the meat so as the ingestion of blood is not sanctioned by the Bible. Aside from this, it is sometimes used in favor of common table salt within cooking practices, as it can provide a somewhat different texture to your food.

Outside of this practice, salt is widely known throughout the magickal and occult world for its ability to add to spell work, and has been known for such for centuries. Most commonly, it is used in protection magick. In this case it can be used in any number of methods, from using the actual salt to draw seals and magick circles to adding it to ritual baths and floor washes. Other more common traditions range from throwing it over the shoulder for good luck to sprinkling it over cursed objects and places to break the curses involved, or otherwise remove hexes and jinxes.

 

2oz $3.95

$20.95

$2.95

Kudzu Root, cut

Considered one of the 50 fundamental herbs of traditional Chinese Medicine, Kudzu (pueraria lobata) has a long history of being used medicinally. A plant that is quite hearty and difficult to remove, it can also be considered an invasive species, where it can expand at a startling rate of 150,000 acres a year. Because of its beneficial qualities, this is often overlooked however. In the Southern United states its rapid growth has even been adapted so that the root is included in the making of soaps, lotions, jelly, and compost.

Medicinally, Kudzu is perhaps most well known as a traditional hang over cure. It is also considered to aid in recovering from alcoholism, and Harvard Medical School is even studying how extracts from the plant can be used to create a medical drug. Kudzu also includes daidzin, a cancer preventative that is similar to antileukemic agents, making it potentially advantageous in cancer research as well. Aside from these qualities, herbalists also recommend Kudzu for treating migraines, cluster headaches, and even allergies and diarrhea.

 

1oz $2.95

$31.95

$2.95

Lady's Mantle, cut

The origin of Lady's Mantle's (alchemilla xanthochlora) lore is obscured in the mid ages, where the clash of Christianity with old pagan traditions resulted in many the renaming and alteration of many forms of tradition and lore. However, it's old name Nine Hooks suggests that it was revered by the Saxons due to the Saxon reverence of the number nine, and many hold that it was also sacred to women, and possibly some Pre-Christian Goddess. Whatever the case, it was dedicated to the Virgin Mary in the mid ages in part due to its shape, which resembled a Lady's cloak, and also due to its many curative powers. These powers left it revered as well by Alchemists, who believed due collected from its petals could help in creating the philosopher's stone.

Though modern herbalists don't quite agree that Lady's Mantle can restore virginity and youth to women as was once believed, it is however revered for its ability to aid in treating menstrual pain and the symptoms of menopause. Some also use it for treating bleeding both internal and external, and for easing nausea. Some herbalists have also used it in creating lotions for insect bites, eczema, and other such skin problems.

 

2oz $4.95

$33.95

$2.95

Lavender

Lavender flowers, or Lavandula angustifolia, are famed throughout the world, not only for their beauty but for their many culinary and agricultural uses as well. In agriculture, the flowers are used because of their abundant nectar, from which honey bees can create a high quality honey that is marketed worldwide as a premium product. Lavender flowers are also used widely as a flavoring for baked goods and desserts, and are on occasion candied to be used as a decoration for dishes. There are also references to Lavender flowers which date back to biblical times, showing that it was used to prepare the Holy Essence. The Romans also favored it to scent their bath waters and aid in restoring their skin, paying the equivalent of a farm worker's monthly wage for only a small amount. Ancient and modern spiritual practices also found great use for the flowers, using Jasmine in spells seeking love and healing, as well as inner calm or a peace of mind. With these properties it became a favored component in spells seeking money, protection, purification, or contact with good spirits.

In medicine Lavender flowers are known for being usable as an antiseptic as well as an anti-inflammatory, and even saw use during World War I disinfecting the floors and walls of hospitals. Some herbalists also believe it to be of use in healing and soothing insect bites and acne, and Lavender has been a traditional treatment for skin burns, headaches, as well as helping one relax before sleeping.

 

2oz $3.95

$19.95

$2.95

Lechitin, Grandulated

Lechitinis actually the generic term for a fatty substance extracted from both plant and animal tissues. In modern practice, it is most commonly extracted from readily available (and renewable) sources such as soy beans. Commerciallyu, you will find it most widely used in non-stick products, such as non-stick cooking sprays and other such items as Lechitin can be completely metabolized by humans.

Among herbalists and in commercial industry, Lechitin is used as an emulsifier. This means that iti s used to stabilize other ingredients within a product, and keep them from separating. This is particularly true of products like capsules and gels.

 

1oz $2.95

$22.95

$2.95

Lemon Balm, cut

Not to be confused with bee balm, Melissa officinali (or Lemon Balm) is native to Southern Europe and the Mediterranean region, and is known for attracting bees; a fact that often results in confusion with Bee Balm. Lemon balm can be found used in the flavoring of ice cream and herbal teas, both of the hot and iced varieties, and is usually found in a combination with other herbs such as spearmint, or paired with fruit dishes and candies. Some lore also holds that the leaves can be crushed and rubbed on the skin as a repellant for mosquitoes.

Modern herbalists find that it also has natural antibacterial properties, and that the teas made with Lemon Balm can be used as a sedative or calming agent. It has also long been used in strengthening the immune system, aiding with the symptoms of cold and flu, as well as in the reduction of fevers. As one might imagine from the strengthening of the immune system, it can also be used as a general preventative aid in remaining free of infection and disease. Some herbalists also claim that Lemon Balm is useful in treating nerve disorders, including those that involve fainting, hysteria, and migraine headaches.

 

2oz $2.95

$10.95

$1.95

Lemongrass, cut

Found in many sources under the formal name of Cymbopogon citratus, lemongrass can also find mention in herbals and other sources of folklore as barbed wire grass, silky heads, citronella grass, and fever grass. Native to India, it finds wide use in Asian cuisine, appearing in everything from teas and soups to curry, and the seasoning of poultry and seafood. Varieties are also used in the production of citronella, which can be used as insect repellent and aroma therapy. In India, the oils of this grass are used to preserve ancient manuscripts, functioning at a pesticide and a preservative as it keeps insects away from the leaves of the ancient works, as well as keeping them from becoming brittle and dry.

Medicinally, Brazilians have long used it as a tea for anxiety and other traditions have long used it in an herbal soup that is good for cough and cold. It has also been shown to have antifungal properties. In 2006 a study found that Lemongrass can cause apoptosis in malignant cancer cells. This essentially causes cancer cells to kill themselves, while leaving normal cells unharmed. This potentially huge breakthrough resulted in a great deal of excitement, but the study requires further testing before such test results can be confirmed and deemed safe.

 

2oz $3.95

$20.95

$2.95

Lemon Peel, cut

Cultivated and used in food and ritual for thousands of years, lemons are very frequently simply peeled and consumed, with the peels being discarded. The peel, however, is actually quite edible and safe to eat. Indeed, it makes a fantastic addition to the kitchen, and has been found mixed with melted butter, served over fish or in flavoring pies, cakes and other such confections. Though it can provide quite a bitter taste if too much is added, in smaller amounts it provides a pleasant, citrusy taste to a wide array of dishes.

While rarely attributed any use outside of culinary practices in the Western world, Lemon peel has been used for quite some time in Africa and India for medicinal purposes. In Africa, it has a reputation for being quite functional in the treatment of baby's colic. In India, the peel is frequently used to soothe upset stomachs. More recent study has also shown that the peel can be quite useful as a source of calcium, potassium and vitamin A, with some research even suggesting that it can help prevent the growth of abnormal tissues on the skin or support the reduction of various sorts of skin melanoma.


1oz $3.95

$29.95

$3.95

Lemon Verbena Leaf, cut

Exuding a delightful lemony scent, Lemon Verbena, or Aloysia triphylla, comes from a flowering plant that produces lavender or white hued blossoms briefly in August or September. Quite frequently used in culinary practices, the herb is often used to add a lemon flavor to fish or poultry dishes, and can also be found in flavoring marinades, salad dressings, and numerous other desserts and soft drinks. Tradition and folk lore also hold that Lemon Verbena can be a powerful aid in magick, being of particular use in both protection and love spells. Some wear it in this manner as an aid in increasing charms and attracting the opposite sex, while others wear a sprig around the neck to stop dreaming. It can also be used in addition to other charms, to otherwise increase their power.

In more modern herbalism, Lemon Verbena is traditionally used for aromatherapy where it is used to calm and relax, and when its leaves are dried they can retain their wonderful scent for years. This results in it being a popular addition to potpourri as well. Despite these advantages, Lemon Verbena is still perhaps most popular in the culinary world, and is often used to replace lemon zest or in other such practice.

 

2oz $3.95

$20.95

$2.95

Licorice, cut

Recognized globally as variety of candy and a flavoring for soft drinks, Licorice Root, or Glycyrrhiza glabra, has also long been known to possess a wide variety of beneficial qualities. In Chinese Medicine, it has been used for ages to harmonize the other ingredients in a formula, as well as to help carry the formula to the twelve "regular meridians." It has also been found as a flavoring agent in soft drinks, herbal teas, as well as in medicine to help disguise the unpleasant tastes of some of the other ingredients. In Italy and Spain Licorice is chewed as a breath freshener, and Chinese cuisine uses it as a spice, often for broth and foods simmered in soy sauce.

Since ancient times, it has also been used as an expectorant, particularly in Ayurvedic Medicine. Modern cough syrups frequently use licorice extracts, proving once more some of the wisdom of the lore of old. Conventional and naturopathic treatments of mouth and peptic ulcers sometimes also utilize Licorice, and it may be used as a topical agent for treating shingles and, as some herbalists claim, oral or genital herpes. Licorice has also been found to be of use in treating digestive ailments such as leaky gut syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, and Crohn's Disease. Note: Use should be avoided if you are pregnant, nursing, or have high blood pressure.

 

1oz $2.95

$31.95

$2.95

Linden Flower, cut

The Linden Flower appears within a wide range of myth, legend, and lower for thousands of years. In Greek Myth, it is said that the beautiful Nymph gave birth to the centaur Chiron. Disgusted by his form, she turned to the gods in shame and hysteria and begged them to help. In turn, Kronos transformed her into the Linden Tree. In later years, it was a common folk remedy for anxiety, nervous, and hysteria.

In modern herbalism, the Linden flower has shown itself to have a relaxing effect, and is often used to ease nervous tension or as a sedative and antispasmodic. It is also valued for containing antioxidants, and is being explored in treating liver damage.

 

1oz $2.95

$28.95

$2.95

Lobelia, cut

1oz $4.95

$64.95

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Low John Root

Known by a wide variety of names including Little John to Chew and Chewing John, and even Court Case Root, Low John is the common name for what others refer to as Galangal. It has been utilized often in oriental cuisines, most famously perhaps in Tom Yum Soup and Dtom Kha Gai, and in the raw form Low John root offers a smell quite similar to that of citrus fruit, with other earthy fragrances reaching ones senses as well. Within some portions of Southeast Asia and Indonesia it is also used as a tonic for soothing stomachs.

In Hoodoo, where Low John is most frequently known and utilized, Low John is viewed as a powerful component in seeking favor in court cases, as you might have guessed by its other alias of Court Case Root. Therein it is frequently viewed to help sway justice to your side. Otherwise, it has also seen a great deal of use in money drawing spells, spells that protect and break hexes and curses, and even sex and psychic magic.

 

2oz $4.95

$31.95

$2.95

Lungwort Leaf, cut

Widely used medicinally throughout the medieval period, Lungwort (Pulmonaria officinalis, Jerusalem Cowslip, or Herb of Mary) was actually one of the herbs used in original, documented, attempts to cure the bubonic plague that swept through Europe. It was also later used as an herb that was supposed to offer protection against evil magic and evil spirits, and was sometimes used to identify witches.

Today, most herbalists recognize Lungwort as possessing qualities that make it useful for relieving pain, and reducing inflammation. It is also an expectorant, making it useful in treating bronchial problems. To this end it has, in the past, been used to create a soothing gargle. Lungwort is also said to be quite useful in stopping bleeding, and is often used to help heal after passing kidney stones.

 

1oz $3.95

$41.95

$3.95

Lycii Berries, whole

Known also as Chinese Matrimony Vine, Wolfberry or - more famously - Goji Berry, Lycii Berry is perhaps one of the more well known supplements used within Traditional Chinese Medicine. Within this practice it is quite known for restoring youth, vigor, and vitality, particularly among men. Lycii berries have also demonstrated themselves to be quite rich in nutrients and antioxidant qualities, and are often hailed within herbalist circles as a "superfood."

Scientific study has demonstrated that Lycii berries can benefit those struggling with blood pressure problems and blood cholesterol levels. Studies have also taken place to examine its aid in improving liver and kidney function. Perhaps further supporting the traditional uses within Chinese Medicine, Lycii berries are also sometimes prescribed to improve vision, restore skin, and otherwise improve erectile function. It is advised to avoid use if pregnant.

 

2oz $4.95

$31.95

$2.95

Maca Root Powder

Maca root (Lepidum Mayenil) is a tuber grown and originating in Peru, within the Andes mountains. Of growing popularity today, it was always considered a valuable resource, and was traded with other tropical foods and even considered a form of payment for the Spanish Imperial Taxes. Traditionally, the root was roasted fresh, though it can also be mashed or boiled, and was sometimes even used in the creation of a baking flour or a weak beer known as chichi de maca. Legends also speak of Inca warriors eating Maca before battle, using it to increase their strength and stamina.

In more modern practice, Maca is considered by many herbalists to be a super food and herbal supplement, providing the benefit of numerous minerals, vitamins, and other nutrients, including amino acids, sterols, and fatty acids. It is also widely used for sexual dysfunction and infertility in men, herein the nutritional aspects of the root benefit the endocrine system. It is also said to generally increase stamina and mental concentration for both genders, and is even prescribed medicinally in Norway.

 

1 root $5.95

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Maguey Root

Commonly known as agave, or agave tequilana, Maguey is a plant native to Mexico that is perhaps most commonly known in modern times for its use in the creation of Tequila. In this use, it is grown into its twelfth year before its heart is harvested for its sap. However it was once worshiped for its abundance of uses, and the people of Mexico's highlands once used it for food and drink, and used the fibers to construct ropes, twines, and other such materials used within construction and every day life.

Most of the conventional properties of the plant are attributed to its leaves and thorns, but spiritually the root is generally revered for its qualities of purification. As such it is often used as a ritual component, such as those you might put in a mojo bag, to purify and cleanse. Alternately, and quite popularly, the root is also often used as part of charms that inspire lust.

 

1oz $2.95

$27.95

$2.95

Mandrake, cut

Often resembling a human figure, Mandrake, the common name for the plants of the genus Mandragora, root has been used in magical rituals for centuries, and is still used today in Neopagan, Wiccan, and German Revivalist practices. This original root, being quite difficult to obtain due to various local, regional, and international laws is also often substituted within magical practice by the North American variety, Podophyllum peltatum. This substitution does result in some controversy however. The root can be traced back to the Old Testament, where there are accounts of it being used in practices intended to aid fertility. Indeed, the fact that the Hebrew word for mandrake means love plant. Among some Asian cultures, it is also believed to help ensure that conception occurs. Among western legends, it has also long been held that when mandrake is dug up it lets out a scream so terrible that it kills everyone who hears it. Elaborate methods of pulling the root from the earth were therefore devised, with the famous chronicler Josephus even writing of methods involving using a dog to pluck mandrake from the earth so as to keep the man harvesting it from dying. Mandrake has also long been the source of mystical speculation, with some viewing it as the primordial origin of man, while others have repeatedly written of it as being a key component in the creation of a Homunculus; a creation spoken of in alchemy and other arcane arts that creates something akin to an artificial human. Folklore also held that mandrake only grew where a hung man had dripped semen to the ground, and that mandrake has potent powers that aid in fending off and protecting against demonic possession.

It is important to note that all parts of the mandrake plant are poisonous. Some herbalist traditions hold that the Mandrake root has hallucinogenic properties and can, in large doses, induce madness and delirium. Contrary perhaps to this common wisdom, some have also claimed that mandrake can be useful as a purgative.

 

1oz $3.95

$40.95

$3.95

Mangosteen Powder

A tropical evergreen hat produces a purple fruit, the Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) has been used for centuries in the treatment of wounds, skin infections, and dysentery. There have arisen various legends concerning its properties, with some believing its full properties can only be observed near the equator, while others speak of a rich bounty for a fresh Mangosteen fruit offered by Queen Victoria.

Ongoing research is still exploring the many beneficial properties of Mangosteen. These include its use as an anti-inflammatory and anti-histamine. Mangosteen is also believed to be useful in treating skin disorders such as psoriasis or eczema, and is used otherwise in the traditional use of boosting stamina and resistance to fatigue. Some studies currently underway are also exploring the use of Mangosteen in killing cancer cells, though there have not yet been any conclusive results.

 

2oz $2.95

$13.95

$1.95

Marjoram Leaf Powder

A member of the mint family of plants along with Basil, Thyme, Hyssop, Lavender, and eve Sage, Marjoram (Marjorana hortensis) is grown throughout the world, and has deep historical roots. It was well known by the ancient Greeks, who gave us it's the legend of its creation in which it was believed Aphrodite created it as a symbol of happiness.There it was used in garlands to ensure a happy marriage and laid on tombs to give peace to departed souls.

In modern herbal practice, Marjoram is perhaps most popularly found in tea as well as a spice utilized in cooking practices with a taste that is similar to Oregano.It has been used for the pain of rheumatism and for sprains, and has also be used to create oils for toothaches. It is also highly prized for treating eczema. Internally, Marjoram tea is supposed to be great for treating stomach pain and indigestion, as well as a wide range of cold and flu symptoms.

 

2oz $3.95

$18.95

$2.95

Marshmallow Root, cut

An herbal addition to food and medicine used widely used since the ancient times, Marshmallow root has seen use throughout the mediterranean region which rapidly spread to most of the rest of the world. Varieties were used in food by the Chinese and the Ancient Egyptians, as well as in much of countries near the Balkan region of Europe. The ancients spoke of it often for its healing properties, with Pliny even stating that a small amount would help prevent illness and disease while others of the ancient world would use them to decorate the graves of friends. Today it is even used in cleaning Persian carpets, as many in the Middle East using it as a cleaner that does not harm the vegetable dyes within the wool. Spiritually, it is sometimes held to help attract good spirits.

Herbalists these days most commonly use the root in gargles to treat sore throats. This began in ancient Egypt and continues to today, with varieties being used in France that included egg whites and rose water flavorings. This French variety evolved into resembling the modern Marshmallow, which actually contains no marshmallow root at all.

 

2oz $3.95
$21.95
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Marshmallow Root, Powder

Having been used since ancient times, Marshmallow root was originally used throughout the Mediterranean region before spreading widely to most of the rest of the world. Varieties of Marshmallow root were used in food by the Chinese and Ancient Egyptians, as well as in many of the countries of the Balkan region of Europe. The ancients revered the root for its healing properties, with many writing of its ability to help prevent illness and disease, while still others of the ancient world would use it to decorate the grave of deceased loved ones. Today it is also often used as a cleaning product, often favored for cleaning expensive Persian carpets as it will not harm the vegetable dyes used to create the colors within the fine fabrics. In modern spiritual practice, Marshmallow root is also believed to help attract good spirits.

Modern herbalists typically prescribe Marshmallow root for use in gargles intended to treat sore throats. This began in ancient Egypt and continues today, with varieties of methods also being used in France that included egg whites and rose water for flavoring. This French variety evolved into the modern Marshmallow, which actually contains no marshmallow root at all!

2oz $3.95

$19.95

$1.95

Meadowsweet, cut

Also known as Filipendula ulmaria, Queen of the Meadow, Meadowwort, and Bridewort, Meadowsweet grows throughout Europe and western Asia, and has become naturalized in North America. Used throughout the ages, the earliest examples of use were found in ancient, Bronze Age burial chambers, where it was used to either flavor or scent mead or as a flower, offered to the dead. Meadowsweet also has a history within Welsh lore, where it was noted as one of the herbs used to fashion the woman known as "Flowerface." Throughout medieval times it was also used during festivals and weddings, where it was strewn throughout churches and used to fashion bridal garlands. It was also quite commonly used to strew across floors, and was one of the favored such flowers of Queen Elizabeth.

Herbalists traditionally know Meadowsweet as a remedy for an acidic stomach as well as a treatment for diarrhea. It has also shown itself to be useful in treating aches and pains of the joints and muscles, as well as easing of headaches. This is perhaps due to the fact that it contains one of the chief chemicals that was later used to create Aspirin.

 

2oz $2.95

$14.95

$1.95

Milk Thistle

The first thing most people think of when they hear of the milk thistle plant is the milky sap that fills its stalks. In The 16th century, the plant was quite popular, with nearly all parts of the plant being eaten. The raw roots were often eaten plain, boiled or roasted, while the shoots were boiled as a vegetable. The leaves were often treated in a manner similar to spinach, and the spiny portion of the flower was eaten like an artichoke. Indeed, Early Christians even dedicated the plant to Mary, and referred to Milk Thistle as Marian Thistle. Today however, the plant's seeds are what have better earned the claim to fame. For 2000 years they have been used to treat liver issues, and aid in protecting the liver from toxins, with increasing scientific research as to the therapeutic and medicinal properties.

Today studies have reported that the seeds can be used to treat liver cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis, toxin induced liver damage and gall bladder disorders. Milk Thistle, or Silybum marianum seeds have also been shown to help reduce and eliminate liver damage. Outside of treating the liver, some studies have also shown that they can lower cholesterol levels and reduce insulin resistance for those with diabetes. In cancer treatments, some have shown that the seeds can reduce the growth of cancer cells in breast, cervical, and prostate cancers though further study is required in this matter. Milk Thistle seeds have also been shown promise in aiding with substance abuse, diminishing the withdrawal symptoms of opiate addiction.

 

2oz $3.95

$21.95

$2.95

Mistletoe, cut

Mistletoe can be found figuring prominently in the folklore of the ancients of a great many cultures. In Greek Mythology, it is believed to be the Golden Bough of Aeneas, who was led from Troy by Venus to found Rome. In Norse mythology, Mistletoe was reportedly what killed Baldr, who was the god of light and beauty. Within Celtic and Druidic beliefs, mistletoe is often considered a remedy for the barrenness of animals, as well as a cure for poison, though, ironically, the berries of Mistletoe are poisonous. With leaves that stay green year-round and fruit that appears around the Celtic birth of the New Year, the Winter Solstice, it was frequently used in Druidic rites involving the holiday, and grew into a symbol of immortality. Later Christians also held that Mistletoe was a tree that furnished the cross, and then shriveled after the crucifixion, and becoming a parasitic vine. Aside from these traditions, it has also been known in spells and rituals where it is used to produce an aphrodisiac effect, or aid in fertility and love. It has also been held as a sacred form of protection that can help produce prophetic visions.

In Europe, the leaves and twigs are rather popular among herbalists in treating circulatory and respiratory system problems. Some also prescribe treatments of mistletoe where it is said to help with hypertension and epilepsy, as well as menstrual problems, hemorrhage, and headache. Ingestion is typically discouraged however, as mistletoe can be poisonous, depending on what variety of mistletoe is used and where it grows.

 

2oz $3.95

$24.95

$2.95

Mistletoe, Powder

Valued in mythology throughout Europe and magical lore, Mistletoe, or Viscum album, is still valued in modern herbalism. In Greece it was believed to be the Golden Bough of Aeneas while further north, the Norse believed it to be Mistletoe that killed Baldr, who was the god of light and beauty. Within Celtic and druidic beliefs, mistletoe is often considered a cure for barrenness in animals, and even a cure for poison. Interestingly, the berries of Mistletoe are, in fact, toxic. In later years, Christians adapted the mythology of Mistletoe within the belief that Mistletoe was a tree used to furnish the cross, and it then shriveled after the crucifixion, becoming a parasitic vine. Magical lore has maintained however that in spells and rituals mistletoe can be used to produce an aphrodisiac effect, or aid in fertility and love. Many also believe that it is quite useful as a sacred form of protection, that can help produce prophetic visions.

Modern herbalism's high regard for powdered Mistletoe holds that it can be useful in treating hypertension and epilepsy. The circulatory and respiratory systems are also treated using the powder, as well as headaches, menstrual problems, and hemorrhages.

 

2oz $4.95

$26.95

$2.95

Mojo Wish Bean

 

2oz $2.95

$18.95

$1.95

Motherwort, cut

Also commonly known as Lion's Tail due to its likeness, Motherwort (Leonurus cardiac) has a long history within the traditional medical practices of Central Europe, Asia, and North America. Within this practice it is almost exclusively known for its ability to help women who are giving birth, and as such almost certainly acquired its name from the midwives who popularly used it. Motherwort also has a wide range of spiritual associations with fertility and creation.

Some studies have shown that Motherwort can be useful in calming the nervous system, helping to relieve the trauma and stress during child birth. Beyond this, it can also aid in encouraging retractions of the uterus to be synchronized, helping to ease the actually birthing process. Studies beyond the processes of child birth have also explored Motherwort as potentially being a treatment for heart palpitations.

 

2oz $2.95

$16.95

$1.95

Mugwort, cut

Known as well as common wormwood, Artemisia vulgaris, felon herb, chrysanthemum weed, wild wormwood, Old Uncle Henry, Sailor's Tobacco, Old Man, and St John's Plant, Mugwort is native to Europe, Asia, and North Africa, and has become an invasive weed in North America. Its leaves have have long been used as a flavoring agent to season fat, meat, or fish, and is perhaps most famously known for seasoning Goose in Germanic traditions. In Japan and Korea it is also known for being used to color festive rice cakes, and is a common seasoning within Korean soups and pancakes. It should be noted that Mugwort can be a hallucinogenic, but when cooked those properties are neutralized. In the mid-ages Mugwort was part of a herbal mix called Gruit, which was used to flavor beer before the widespread use of hops, likely resulting in hallucination as well as inebriation! In ancient and medieval times Mugwort was also used for its magical properties, where it was seen as a protective herb that could dispel fatigue and protect a traveler from evil spirits and wild animals. Indeed, it was included in the 10th century "Nine Herb Charm" that is said to ward off poison and illness. It is also supiced to be a potent aid in lucid dreaming, astral travel, and otherwise increasing the intensity of dreams, as well as the ability to control and remember them.

In Ayurveda medicine in India, Mugwort is also used for cardiac complaints, feelings of unease, and general malaise. Within Chinese medicine, it is pulverized and aged into a form called Moxa. In this form it has shown a great deal of aid in positioning fetuses that are in breech positioning. Moxa and acupuncture has also been shown to slow fetal heart rates while increasing fetal movement. Moxa has also been shown however to possibly cause uterine contractions.

 

2oz $2.95

$18.95

$1.95

Muira Puama Root, cut

Originating in the Amazon, Muira Puama Root (Ptychopetalum Olacoides) is traditionally known as a potent aphrodisiac, and for this reason it first attracted the attention of herbalists. Soaked in rum and buried for a week, the result extract is often used to improve libido and performance. It is often used to enhance stamina, mental clarity, and increase energy.

Scientific study has shown that Muira Puama root can increase blood flow to the pelvis region and possibly balance hormones. This has been observed to increase libido, improve erections in men, and improve sensitivity and orgasm in women. Long term use has demonstrated some increase in sex hormones for both genders.

 

2oz $3.95

$18.95

$2.95

Mullein Leaf, cut

Known elsewhere as candlewick plant, hag taper, and lady's candle, and Verbascum thapsus , Mullein is native to both Europe and Asia. Used for tinder and lamp wicks, folklore held that witches used lamps that were lit with such wicks for their incantations. Among some folk, this gave rise to the name of Hag's taper. Mullein was also used as funerary rites, with stalks being dipped in suet and burned at funerals. Wise tales also held that mullein was quite useful in treating diseases of cattle. In both Europe and Asia it was said that mullein could drive away evil spirits, and in India it was considered a safeguard against magic as well. There is even mention of mullein performing this task in ancient times, with the Iliad giving mention of Ulysses using mullein to ward off the sorcery of Circe.

Herbalists have long made note its use in treating pectoral complaints. It is also supposed to be of great use in treating the bleeding of lungs and bowls. As an expectorant, it has also seen use in treating sore throats, coughs, and lung disease. Some herbalists also use it in a poultice which is used to treat hemorrhoid complaints. Possessing slight sedative properties, Mullein has also been found as an active ingredient in many alternative smoking blends, and it has also been used to treat migraines and long lasting headaches.

 

2oz $4.95

$29.95

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Nutritional Yeast Flour

Popular among vegans and vegetarians, nutritional yeast is perhaps most well known for its flavor, described occasionally as nutty or cheesy, and leaves it as a popular cheese substitute in recipes, or as a condiment. Perhaps notably it is used by vegans in place of parmesan cheese, and is popularly used to top popcorn, potatoes, and tofu or eggs. Used for much the same purpose globally, Nutritional Yeast is also known in Australia by the name of Savory Yeast, leaving it well known by that name as well. Among nutritionists, herbalists, and dietitians, Nutritional Yeast is well known as a fantastic source of protein and B-complex vitamins. It is most widely prescribed for the fact that it is a reliable source of Vitamin B12, and is therefore great for those who are deficient in that vitamin. For those on strict diets it is also naturally quite low in fat and sodium.

 

2oz $3.95

$21.95

$2.95

Nettles Leaf, cut

 

2oz $2.95

$14.95

$1.95

Oat Straw, cut (organic)

 

2oz $2.95

$13.95

$1.95

Olive Leaves, whole

Olive Trees have been cultivated and revered for thousands of years. Indeed, among the ancient Greeks and Romans they were often considered sacred, and their creation was attributed to Athena. Even within biblical texts was it referred to as the Tree of Life. While most attention is paid to the fruit, Olive Leaves are also well known for their beneficial and medicinal qualities. They were used of old for everything from reducing fevers to correcting excessive mucus.

Modern usage of the olive leaf is still commonly practiced by herbalists, with common usages being to treat coughs and skin problems, where it is believed to help fight infection and detoxify. Though lacking somewhat in clinical study, some herbalists also explore the use of Olive Leaves in treating fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome as well.

 

2oz $2.95

$13.95

$1.95

Orange Peel, cut

Most often simply discarded, orange peel has quietly demonstrated a great many of uses that sadly go unnoticed. When powdered, it has demonstrated the ability to help improve skin, particularly when used in baths and other such washes. Orange peels have also seen a wide degree of use commercially in house hold cleaners, where they give rise to a great deal of the citrus fragrances that populate the market. Some herbalists have also shown that it is effective when applied to exposed skin in repelling pesky insects, and some have also used it in a puree that is poured into invasive anthills, to prevent ants from accessing the home.

Further study has shown that orange peel is also a source of pectin, an indigestible carbohydrate that stimulates the growth of probiotic bacteria in the large intestine. These bacteria help prevent food-borne pathogens. Orange Peel has also been shown to aid in the prevention of indigestion, lower cholesterol, and help in the digestion of fatty foods. It has been studied as an anti-cancer agent, and supplementing with orange peel powder is a healthy way to increase Vitamin C intake, thus improving overall health in regards to the increased immunity to cold and flu that Vitamin C provides, as well as aiding digestion and preventing food-related illnesses.


1oz $2.95

$32.95

$2.95

Oregon Grape Root, cut

Not actually a variety of grape at all, Oregon Grape root (mahonia aquifolium) is actually related to Barberry. An evergreen shrub that grows within the Northwestern regions of North America, it was well known to Northwestern tribes of Native Americans. These indigenous people would most commonly use it to treat upset stomachs.

Herbalists have taken up favor of Oregon Grape root as an alternative to Goldenseal, as it offers many of the same qualities but is much more plentiful in the wild. Studies have shown it to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial qualities, which would very well explain its ability to ease upset stomachs. Some scientists are also actively exploring the possibilities of Oregon Grape Root as an anti-cancer drug, though much more extensive testing is required before its usefulness is determined.

 

1oz $4.95

$51.95

$4.95

Orris Root Powder

Orris Root is a term used to describe the roots of the Iris Germania, the Iris Florentina, and the Iris Pallida. While once widely used medicinally, it is now most widely used in the creation of perfume and scented oils. Depending on exactly how it is to be used, Orris Root must first go through a drying period that lasts up to five years or more, making it a sought after resource in the creation of these blends, as it is readily dissolved in water or other such liquid. Within perfume and scented oils, its most commonly used for a gentle base scent. It has also been used to flavor tinctures and syrups, wherein it is said to have a taste nearly indistinguishable from raspberry.

Medicinally, Orris Root was used primarily to treat minor ailments, most notably for its anti-inflammatory effect. This was used often to treat and ease sore throats and other symptoms of the common cold. Orris root can also be a mild diuretic.

 

1oz $5.95

$71.95

$5.95

Osha Root, whole

A Native of the North American Rockies, Osha Root is known by a wide variety of common and folk names, including Chachapate, Indian Parsley, Porter's lovage, mountain lovage, bear root, bear medicine, nipo, and Colorado Cough Root. Osha Root is among those rare herbs that cannot be readily reproduced outside of its natural habitat, where it is known for having an effect on bears akin to catnip. Indeed, bears have been observed rolling in it much like a cat will, and are known to eat it when they are first out of hibernation. Observers also report having seen bears chew it up into a paste of sorts, before cleansing themselves by rolling in it. Some also claim to have observed male bears digging it up and offering it to females in courtship! Native Americans often, understandably, held the root as sacred for these and other reasons. It is said to be great for purification and dreaming, with some Apache Tribes using it as snake or insect repellant.

Modern herbalists also hold Osha Root in high esteem, in particular because of its antiviral qualities. It can be used to treat cold and flu, as well as ailments of the respiratory system. It is often chewed for the medicinal quality of the roots and then spat out. Some also use it for treatment of fever, stomach ache, and heart burn.

 

1oz $3.95
$47.95
$3.95

Papain Powder

Derived from the papaya fruit, Papian powder is actually a digestive enzyme that has seen a wide range of use within medical practice, and is perhaps most widely known for its great use as a meat tenderizer. Folk uses for Papain powder range from treating bee stings to helping to cleanse teeth and gums.

Papain Powder works as a meat tenderizer by helping with protein synthesis and repair, and as a supplement it can help in digesting proteins or otherwise aiding digestive problems.. Some herbalists and medical practitioners have also explored its use in treating back pain and injury, allergies, and possibly even asthma. This has resulted somewhat in its exploration within sports medicine.

 

2oz $3.95
$24.95
$2.95

Passion Flower, cut

Having been quite popular in Victorian Times, Passion Flower (Passiflora incarnata) is now cultivated widely in gardens for cosmetic purpose throughout the world. In India, it is known as the Rakhi Flower, named such after the festival of Rakhi, in which it is used, which celebrates the bond between brothers and sisters. Passion flower has also seen many years of use among the varied Native American tribes, but is particularly noted among the Aztecs. They used it as a tea for treating insomnia and hysteria, as well as epilepsy, valuing the flower's ability to function as a sedative. They also valued the flower for its pain killing properties. In some lore Passion flower is also said to aid in seeking emotional balance, peace, and friendship. Some uses also prescribed it as an aid in achieving prosperity and heightening libido, functioning as an aphrodisiac and perhaps providing the flower with its name.

Herbalists have found that Passion Flower can be used in calming muscle tension and twitching without effecting respiration or mental function. Because of this it can be used in treating anxiety and high blood pressure. It can also be put to use in treating pain that results from muscle tension as well as, in some cases, emotional turmoil. In Europe it is added to medications that are used to treat nerve disorders, heart palpitations, anxiety and high blood pressure. Unlike most mild sedatives, Passion Flower has also been show to be non-addictive.

 

1oz $3.95

$34.95

$3.95

Patchouli Leaf, cut

 

1 root $5.95
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Patchouli Root

 

2oz $2.95

$12.95

$1.95

Pau d'Arco Cut

This ancient plant has been held as popular among the Native Americans of South America, including the Incas, Aztecs, and Indio tribes of Brazil, and the other indigenous peoples of the South American Rain forests. Roughly translated from Portuguese, the name Pau D'Arco means "Bow Tree and it was indeed used for bows as well as numerous other tools. Natives also held that it was a potent cure for diseases, as well as a tonic for strength and well being, and in treating toothaches and backaches. European settlers observed and adapted these uses, with the usage slowly spreading until it can now be found in health food stores globally.

As a health food supplement, it can be found to have antiviral qualities, as well as possessing the ability to strengthen the immune system, particularly after it has been weakened by disease. In this way, it is currently being tested in treating and aiding in the recovery from AIDS and cancer. Pau d'Arco has also long been a known treatment for Candida and other funguses a well as other skin disorders. Herbal lore has also shown that it was useful in treating polio and influenza, and maintains that it can be of use in treating arthritis, diabetes, liver disease, and venereal and rheumatic disorders.

 

2oz $3.95
$22.95
$2.95

Peach Leaf, cut

Best known for the fruit they produce, Peach trees are also beloved for their leaves. Peach leaves are commonly used within herbal teas, and as such are a rather popular commercial beverage. Of old, they were used for a wide range of ailments. One particular Italian legend holds that they could even be used to cure warts by laying them upon the warts and then burying them; by the time the leaves decayed the warts would fall off.

Herbalists have long used peach leaves in healing wounds. However they have also been explored as a sedative and expectorant, and as such have been used in treating whooping cough, bronchitis, and similar chronic ailment. For digestive matters, the peach leaf has also been explored as a diuretic and a laxative.

 

2oz $2.95
$14.95
$1.95

Pennyroyal Leaf, cut

Also known as Mentha pulegium in Latin, Pennyroyal Leaf can be found mentioned in herbals and other documentation by the other common names as Run-by-the-Ground, Look-in-the-ditch, and Pudding Grass. A common cooking herb among Greeks and Romans, it remained popular within culinary practices throughout the mid-ages. The famed writer Pliny listed Pennyroyal as quite conductive to good health, suggesting that it be hung in sleeping rooms. It has also been mentioned in literature of old as being able to purify water, making it drinkable. It was also said to purify blood, cleansing it of illness, and it was often taken with honey for this purpose. Old traditions hold it as being a valuable cure for headaches and giddiness, and prescribed that one wear it around one's head for this. It was also given as an antidote for spasmodic, nervous, and hysterical conditions. In spiritual traditions, it draws on some of these properties to aid in protective and purification magic, and aid in exorcisms.

Modern herbalists use it in another traditional sense, where it is taken to stimulate menstrual flow. In eras past this was used for the purpose of abortion, though this unregulated use was often dangerous and even life threatening to those who used it. Otherwise, it is also used for treating flatulence and gall ailments, and some herbalists still hold that it is a potent aid in treating lung disease, hepatitis, and gout.

 

2oz $2.95

$13.95

$1.95

Peppermint Leaf, cut

ng known to be a popular herb for its smell and taste, there is evidence of Peppermint Leaf (or Mentha piperita in Latin) being cultivated dating as far back as the Ancient Egyptians. The Romans too were known to have loved it, and through this it spread from Southern Europe throughout their vast empire. Medical interest in the leaf was first recorded by the Roman philosopher and writer Pliny, and other documentation dating back to works of the 14th century show it being used for medical purposes by the people of Iceland. By the time of the Elizabethan period, more than 40 ailments were reportedly remedied by mint. Today, however, it is most commonly used in herbal teas and capsules, though the leaf itself is occasionally chewed as a breath freshener. Old lore also holds that it is quite good for stimulating visionary dreams and psychic ability.

Modern herbalists speak of it as an agent that aids in the elimination of foreign particles, and therefore digestion, and within this process can calm the stomach. It has also been shown to relax intestinal muscles, and reduce cramping. It can also be used as a natural relief to respiratory difficulties, and is said to reduce nausea and heartburn. Some herbalists also claim that it can improve bile production, and flow, as well as discourage the growth of harmful bacteria.

 

2oz $3.95

$21.95

$2.95

Periwinkle

Perhaps best known these days as a name for a color, Periwinkle (vinca minor) is actually a flowering plant native to central and southern Europe as well as parts of Asia. Found in many gardens, it is frequently used as ground cover both for its evergreen foliage and spring and summer flowers. Its rapid growth and ability to smother most other plants makes it popular for keeping parts of a garden weed-free without much maintenance, but also leaves it criticized as an invasive plant in some regions of the world.

Herbalists have explored its curative properties for many years and the scientific community has also taken up the study. Periwinkle has been shown to aid in improving blood circulation, but ground breaking studies have also explored it as being able to help enhance memory. As such, it is being further studied as a potential treatment for aging minds. As in most such cases, further study is required for conclusive results.

 

1oz $3.95
$41.95
$3.95

Pipsissewa, cut

Meaning "it breaks into small pieces" in Cree, Pipsissewa (Chimaphila Umbellata) was derives its name from the general belief that it is useful in treating kidney stones. Other tribes of Native Americans also revered it for other properties. For example, the Mohegans and Penobscot tribes generally used it externally to heal blisters and similar afflictions, while the Catawbas would use it as a remedy for back aches and the Thomson Indias used it to reduce swelling in legs and feet.

Modern herbalists have found Pipsissewa to be most useful in treating urinary tract problems. Within this, it is believed to aid in the passing of kidney stones and otherwise alleviate some of the associated difficulties by increasing urine flow. Topically, Pipsissewa is useful in easing swelling, blisters, and sores.

 

2oz $3.95
$18.95
$2.95

Plantain Leaf, cut

Also known as Plantago lanceolata, Ripple Grass, Waybread, Snake Weed, Cuckoo's Bread, and Englishman's foot, Plantain Leaf is frequently freferred to in herbal texts as a plant of healing. Indeed, the famed philosopher Pliny the elder spoke of it as an herb capable of curing madness in dogs, and the theologian Erasmus wrote numerous fabled stories wherein plantain leaf was used as a cure for poison. This was perhaps due o the folk lore that held plantain leaf to be a potent balm in treating snakebites, and in the U.S this lore expanded to the belief that it was of particular use in treating the bite of the rattle snake. Among the Saxons, it was considered one of the nine sacred healing herbs which would aid you in achieving long life and good health. Other traditions also hold it to be particularly good in guarding against jealousy and envy, or otherwise using within healing and protective magic.

Modern herbalists view plantain leaf in a goodly light, seeing it as a potent aid in treating burns and wounds, and as an anti-inflammatory. It is also aid to be quite useful in treating diarrhea and urinary conditions, as well as treating coughs, fevers, and similar cold-related conditions.


1oz $3.95
$41.95
$3.95

Pleurisy Root, cut

Known also as Butterfly Weed, Silkweed, and Wind Root, Ascelpias Tuberosa is perhaps most commonly known as Pleurisy Root. Its use dates back to Native American tribes, who used it as a remedy for pulmonary infections as well as the treatment of wounds. Physicians among settlers readily adopted it and its popularity did not diminish, as it became widely used to treat Pleurisy, from which it derives the common name, and other such ailments. Indeed, the root became featured within the United States Pharmacopoeia in the 1800's and remained there for nearly 100 years.

Modern herbalists still use Pleurisy root to relieve pain and inflammation, and even pleurisy though it is most common for it to be used in treating less severe illness, by helping those treated with it to cough up phlegm, reduce inflammation, and reduce fever through perspiration. Some herbalists also use Pleurisy Root to treat chronic diarrhea and similar digestive ailments, such as dysentery.

 

2oz $3.95
$22.95
$2.95

Poke Root, cut

Regarded as one of the most important plants native to the Americas for a time, the Poke root was widely used in ages past for a myriad of purposes. Its purple buries were long used as a dye, creating a rich purple color for fabrics and even in wines, though vintners eventually stopped using it as the berry spoiled the taste of the wine. The young shoots were also used, boiled and cooked and frequently compared to other greens, like asparagus. Folklore also suggests that it is a powerful stimulate to the immune system and the metabolism.

Some modern study seems to back this lore up, with it being used as an herbal treatment for some varieties of cancer and other immune diseases. This is due to the fact that Poke root seems to be able to stimulate the lymphatic system and help maintain its health; a basic aim of most cancer treatments. Herbalists have also been known to use it in treating rheumatism and as part of an ointment for skin diseases. Unfortunately, Poke root is also known for having side-effects similar to narcotics. In large doses it is said to inhibit mental clarity, and instill feelings of spaciness, and not quite being yourself or otherwise feeling out-of-body. Large doses can also result in nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

 

2oz $3.95
$41.95
$3.95

Prickly Ash Bark, cut

Common prickly ash (Zanthoxylum Americanum) shares many of the same traditional uses as its Asian cousin, the Szechuan Pepper. There its historical use goes back thousands of years to the unpleasant business of being the sole anesthetic for the process involved in creating the Emperor's court Eunuchs. Later, it was more formally recognized within Traditional Chinese Medicine as an agent that warms the middle of the body, bolstering energies that governed digestion and immune response.

Like the current use of the asian cousin, Prickly Ash Bark is now most popular among herbalists as being used to relieve chronic pain. In this manner it is most frequently used within a tea or tincture. Some herbalists also favor it combined with ginger in the treatment of nausea and vomiting.

 

2oz $3.95
$16.95
$2.95

Psyllium Seed Husk Powder

Native to Asia and Europe, Psyllium (plantago ovta) has emerged as a wildly popular agent in gastro intestinal "cleanse" processes. These processes are generally used to flush out the lower digestive track and, in theory, cleansing it of toxins. In many cases this results in reports of significantly improved health concerning the digestive tract and in general terms.

Psyllium seed husk powder is sometimes used instead of the whole husk. This is in part due to the ease with which it may be added to capsules or stirred into water or juice, as is a popular method for using the herb. Ingesting psyllium in this manner is generally taken to alleviate digestive issues and constipation, with psyillium acting as a dietary fiber.

 

2oz $4.95
$30.95
$2.95

Pygeum Bark Powder

owing throughout Southern Africa, the Pygeum Tree (Pygeum Africana), also known as African Plum, is a large evergreen that has been utilized by natives to the region for ages. Its wood is popularly used within the construction both of homes and tools, and it produces a brown plum-like fruit that natives and local animals frequently eat. However, the Pygeum's claim to fame is its bark. Containing an oil with a variety of active ingredients, it is currently the subject of scientific study but has been used by locals for centuries in treating "Old Man Disease," or prostate enlargement.

This medicinal practice among South African tribes has spread into more mainstream medicinal science, and studies have shown that the bark can be quite useful in treating benign prostate enlargement, providing relief to those who suffer from the symptoms.

 

2oz $3.95
$23.95
$2.95

Queen of the Meadow, cut

Queen of the Meadow (Eupatorium Purpureum), also known as Joe Pye weed, is an herb that was actually introduced to America by European settlers. It is often confused with Boneset or Gravel root, as they are of the same genus and have passing resemblance. Within Europe, it was held as Sacred to Druids and was perhaps most famously used by Queen Elizabeth who would have it used as a strewing herb within her chambers.

Possessing aspirin like qualities, Queen of the Meadow actually contains the chemical used to create the over the counter medicine. As such, it was commonly used to reduce fever and reduce pain and is still often prescribed for such by herbalists.

 

2oz $2.95
$15.95
$1.95

Raspberry Leaf, cut

While many hear the word Raspberry and think only of the famed berries, the leaves of the Raspberry plant (Rubus idaeus in Latin), have long been known to possess a great many virtues. With a high concentration of vitamins and minerals, the leaves are sometimes used in aiding pregnancy and delivery. With vitamins C and E present in large amounts, as well as A and B complex, the leaf is supposed to also aid the immune system of women a great deal, and facilitate healthy skin and bone development for babies. It also helps promote circulation, aiding the mother whose blood volume increases a great deal during pregnancy. Containing alkaloids, the leaves of the Raspberry plant are also supposed to help tone muscle, aiding the mother during the actual birthing process. Herbalists of old have also indicated that it can enrich mother's milk, especially when the baby is going through a growth spurt. In metaphysical and occult traditions, Raspberry leaves are also often spoken of as having the ability to aid in producing visions of a divinatory nature, as well as aiding in spells of protection and love.

Raspberry Leaf tea is still often held as a useful infusion to be employed as a gargle for sore mouths and throats. Some herbalists also hold that it can be used to treat throat ulcers, as well as a wash for wounds and ulcers in general. In other cases, herbalists have developed treatments that utilize raspberry leaf to treat stomach pain and discomfort.


1oz $3.95
$47.95
$3.95

Red Root Powder

Known by the botanical name Ceanothus Americanus, and the common names of Wild Snowball, Red Root, and New Jersey Tea, Red Root was actually quite popular for a time as a substitute for actual tea leaves, with its own leaves resembling true Tea in both flavor and appearance. It rapidly became more popular however for its medicinal qualities. Of old, it was widely used for treating dysentery, asthma, chronic bronchitis, whooping cough, gonorrhea, and pulmonary affections; these afflictions being perhaps the most notable it was used to treat during the era of the Civil War.

More modernly, red root is still regarded by herbalists as an astringent, expectorant, sedative, antispasmodic, and antisyphiltic. For these reasons, today's herbalists will still commonly use it to treat skin problems, coughs, and other to serve the nerves.

 

1oz $3.95
$39.95
$3.95

Rhodiola Root Powder

Rhodiala root (Rhodiola rosea) is an herb that grows in northern regions of the world, like Sweden, Finland, Iceland, China, and Russia, and even then it only grows well in high altitudes. Within traditional folk medicine within these regions, it was used to combat a range of ailments, including altitude sickness, cold, and flu. It was also given as a gift to couples who were marrying to help ensure fertility and healthy children.

Rhodiola root is considered to be an adaptogen by many modern herbalists. This means that it helps the body respond to physical and mental stress, or otherwise helps it adapt to circumstance. Specifically, it is said that it may help alleviate depression, and can help reduce fatigue, or otherwise improve physical and mental performance.

 

1oz $2.95
$8.95
$1.95

Rosemary Leaf, whole

This hearty herb, Rosmarinus officinalis, is native to the Mediterranean region has been cultivated and used in culinary and medicinal properties for centuries. Primarily grown for the kitchen, it has also even seen use in helping to prevent erosion in landscaping as well as a topiary plant that can be sculpted easily to please the eye. In cooking, it possesses somewhat of a strong, bitter taste and is used to add to the taste of many traditional dishes, as well as in an ingredient for herbal tea. Of old, it was also famously used for "hungry Water," in the treatment of the Queen of Hungry, and as such was said to revitalize paralyzed limbs as well as treat gout. Rosemary has also had an ancient reputation for improving memory. As such, it is frequently used as a symbol for remembrance in weddings, war commemorations, and in some cases funerals. In the mid ages it was in weddings as a headpiece for the bridge, while the groom and their wedding's guests would wear rosemary sprigs, each representing charms of love. Newlywed couples were also to plant a branch on their wedding day, and if it grew healthily it was to be a good omen. Another common practice of old was to tap one you desired with a rosemary branch, and if it were to blossom you and your desired partner would fall in love. Others still used rosemary leaves to stuff cloth dolls, and in this manner cure illness or attract a lover. Rosemary gardens were also aid to ward away the curses and evil spells of others during the mid-ages.

In more modern studies Rosemary has been shown to actually improve memory, though studies also showed recall in these cases to be somewhat slower. Some herbalists also proscribe it to help lower the risk of strokes and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Lou Gehrig's Disease.

 

2oz $3.95

$17.95

$2.95

Rose Petals, Pink

Rose petals have been used throughout the history of man, both in decoration and in spiritual rituals, and as such can be found throughout ancient texts and the writings of more modern scholars. They have been used to flavor wine and scent perfume, and are highly valued as parts of floral gardens. The Romans would often crown brides and grooms with wreaths of roses, or use them to crown the sacred icons of their gods, such as Cupid, Venus and Bacchus. Within spiritual practices, these pink rose petals are also quite commonly used within rituals of happiness, emotional balance, and love spells.

When used to scent water they can sometimes help soothe headaches and ease stress, and in this way are often utilized by herbalists and aromatherapists. Of old, it was also said that a tonic could be made from them for the treatment of mouth sores, soothing the heart and nerves, and even helping to ease menstrual cramps.

 

2oz $2.95

$13.95

$1.95

Rose Petals and Buds, red

Used by man throughout history, Red Rose Buds have seen numerous mentions in the texts of the ancients as well as more modern scholars. Horace and Pliny write of the fable that the deep crimson rose sprang from the blood of Adonis, a venerated god of the Greek Pantheon. Later, Romans used roses lavishly, strewing them upon floors and floating them in wine. Brides and Grooms were crowned with roses, as were the religious icons of Cupid, Venus and Bacchus. And from this, perhaps, was born the long standing association of these red buds with spells and rituals of love, happiness, and plenty, for which they are used often in many traditions to this day. Among the Romans, and in other cultures, the buds and petals were also scattered at the feet of the victors, making it a powerful symbol for overcoming obstacles and achieving one's goals.

Herbalists of the modern area sometimes use rose buds to treat headache and dizziness. Other applications have seen them used in the treatment of mouth sores, as well as a tonic that is said to be soothing for the heart and the nerves. Others still claim that using rose buds can be an effective treatment for menstrual cramps as well.


2oz $2.95
$10.95
$1.95

Rose Hips, whole

Rose Hips are the fruit of the rose plant. Many myths have long held that these small fruits are poisonous, but modern study has since disproved this misconception. Indeed, despite this folk belief rose hips have also long been used in the creation of herbal teas, jams, jellies, and marmalades. They have also long been used to flavor wines, as well as a soup that is quite popular in Sweden. In the mid ages, Rose Hips were even utilized to make a variety of mead. While these culinary practices were popular in Europe, the Native Americans often applied Rose Hips to medicine, using them to treat cold and flu. Today they are perhaps most commonly found in home fragrance and potpourri. During World War II they were also used in England to make Vitamin C syrup for children, as the more commonly used fruits and vegetables were hard to come by due to German blockade. In some folklore, the fruits of the rose plant were also aid to be quite useful in calling good spirits and bringing good luck.

In more recent years, herbalists still frequently prescribe rose hips for their high concentration of Vitamin C. It is also common for them to be used in the treatment of cold and flu and similar symptoms. Others still have applied a rose hips tonic as a laxative, or even as a topical treatment for acne.

 

2oz $3.95

$16.95

$1.95

Sage Leaf, cut

Common to household herb gardens, Sage (or Salvia officinalis) is often used as a kitchen spice for culinary purposes, but throughout the age has also seen use for its medicinal properties. Indeed, of old it was often highly regarded for these properties, with common sayings such as "Why should a man die whilst sage grows in his garden?" testifying to the beliefs held by every village herbalist and doctor of old. Some also held that it was of great aid in achieving prosperity for businesses, as well as having properties that would aid in mitigating the grief of both mind and body. Sometimes used as a tea for these purposes, the leaves were collected annually for this in many Mediterranean regions. Some cultures also burn sage, seeing the smoke as sacred and having the powers of protection, healing, and prosperity, with the potential to aid in achieving wisdom. It was also sometimes used in the sacred rituals of Native Americans, though they tended to prefer white sage.

Herbalists also sometimes apply Sage Leaf to medicinal purposes, using it in a wash for complications of the mouth, such as bleeding gums, or a gargle for sore throats. Sage leaf has also been used in the treatment of colds and fevers, healing wounds and easing joint pain, and even in aiding with digestion. Some have also suggested that Sage Leaf can be of use in treating depression.


4oz $4.95

$14.95

$1.95

Salt Petre

Commonly known in science as Potassium Nitrate, Salt Petre is a naturally occurring source of Nitrogen. Perhaps most famed for being a component in Black Powder, it was also used in the slow matches used to fire the early matchlock firearms, as well as the old myth that it can be used to cause impotence. Indeed, many rumors abound that Salt Petre can be used by the military upon soldiers to render them impotent (presumably to keep their mind on the fight), or by jealous wives with suspicions of unfaithful husbands. It is also well known within religious and spiritual communities, and has been seen as an aid in curses or in spells that are intended to keep men from staying. Within this some traditions, it has also been used in exorcism rituals, and purification rites.

Despite the old myth that salt petre can render impotence, newer studies have shown that there is some evidence that it can combat high blood pressure. Studies have also shown that salt petre possesses no chemical properties that induce impotence.

 

1oz $2.95

$32.95

$2.95

Sandalwood, red, chips

Widely known for its fragrance, and the essential oil that it is used to produce, Red Sandalwood has been valued for centuries for the qualities it possessing for carving, medical, and spiritual purposes. Indeed, a wide variety of cultures use Red Sandalwood for their religious purposes. Hindu Priests make a past used to decorate icons and religious tools and then distribute it to devotees, who use it to mark their foreheads, neck and chest. Buddhists sometimes consider it akin to the lotus, and use it to transform desire and maintain alertness during meditation. They also use it as a popular offering to the Buddha. Within the Zoroastrian faith, sandalwood is offered to the three grades of fire, and use in this way as a most sacred offering. Priests within Zoroastrian temples often sell red sandalwood as one of their chief forms of income for this purpose. In modern spiritual practices, this has perhaps evolved to leave red sandalwood used often in rituals and spells of healing and purification. It is still often used in meditation, and is generally considered to enhance magical work in general.

In the 1920's and 1930's, red sandalwood was quite popular in medicine. The oil was used for the treatment of fevers and indigestion, as well as an aid in healing bruises, and was used both externally and internally for these purposes. Modern study has also shown that red sandalwood has some antimicrobial properties, perhaps making it useful in preventing the growth of microbes. Red Sandalwood cannot be exported to Canada.

 

1oz $2.95

$32.95

$2.95

Sandalwood, red, powder

 

2oz $3.95
$21.95
$2.95

Sarsaparilla Root, cut

Sarsaparilla (Smilax abidium) is perhaps most well known for being the key ingredient of the soft drink of the same name. Found in Mexico, Central America, and South America, Sarsaparilla has become world-reknowned for soft drinks it is part of, which includes traditional recipes for old style Root Beer. Much of this originates in its medical use, which included being added to sugar water as a sweet and flavorful tonic.

Modern herbalists still value Sarsaparilla for these medical properties. It is generally valued for use in treating of skin disorders and problems like eczema, psoriasis, and similar matters. It is also growing in popularity in its use as an adaptogen, where it can aid in physical responses to stress and fatigue in a manner similar to ginseng.

 

2oz $3.95
$22.95
$2.95

Sassafras, cut

Named in the 16th century by the famed botanist Nicolas Monardes, the word Sassafras is generally agreed to be a corruption of the Spanish word for saxifrage. Despite this, the latin name developed as Sassafras albidum, and the common name Sassafras stuck. Since this time, it has long since been known for its medicinal and culinary properties, as well as having been the subject of a variety of folklore. With the saplings often growing in clusters, you can usually find larger Sassafras trees in bunches, with many shoots and branches deviating from a main trunk. Known for this clustering and its distinctive leaves and flowers, it is also famed for the sweet fragrances it is said to produce. Many say that the roots and leaves possess an aroma that reminds them of citrus, though, depending on who you are speaking with, some might tell you that the crushed leaves produce a scent that is very similar to root beer. In Spanish lore, this Sassafras was well known for its treatment of syphilis, rheumatism, and similar such illness, and it's leaves still finds use in some regions as a condiment or thickening agent for soups. Some lore also speaks of it in a supernatural light, fearing that if it is burned that it will cause another's death as it crackles and pops-perhaps in part due to the fact that its oily wood does not burn well, and produces much smoke.

Today, it is mostly viewed as a wonderful ingredient for tea, with many using its bark and leaves to produce a flavorful tea blend. Though there is some controversy over the matter, Sassafras is still often viewed as a potent holistic aid in relieving the pains of menstruation and rheumatism.

 

1oz $2.95
$24.95
$2.95

Saw Palmetto Berry, cut

Coming from a Palm-like North American plant known as Serenoa repens (with Saw Palmetto being its common name), the Saw Palmetto Berries were long used by local Native American tribes in treating a wide variety of ailments, particularly those involving the genitals, urinary tract, and the reproductive system. The berries were also a common food source to the natives of the regions of Florida, which was later adapted and expanded by the European explorers that settled there. Today, this local lore has expanded to make the berry quite popular in Europe, where it is widely used and researched for these qualities, most commonly perhaps in the form of an extract from the berries.

The berries are known among herbalists as being the source of a potent aphrodisiac for men and women that possesses anabolic properties, which aid in building muscle tissue. Saw Palmetto Berries have also been explored in the treatment of prostate gland enlargement, where it is believed to aid with urinary flow and otherwise be of use as a preventative measure. Some herbalists also prescribe it in the treatment of chronic bronchitis, and general inflammation of the bladder. Cosmetically, the berries have been involved in treatment and study of hair loss prevention.

 

2oz $2.95
$25.95
$2.95

Saw Palmetto Berry, powder

Coming from a Palm-like North American plant known as Serenoa repens (with Saw Palmetto being its common name), the Saw Palmetto Berries were long used by local Native American tribes in treating a wide variety of ailments, particularly those involving the genitals, urinary tract, and the reproductive system. The berries were also a common food source to the natives of the regions of Florida, which was later adapted and expanded by the European explorers that settled there. Today, this local lore has expanded to make the berry quite popular in Europe, where it is widely used and researched for these qualities, most commonly perhaps in the form of an extract from the berries.

The berries are known among herbalists as being the source of a potent aphrodisiac for men and women that possesses anabolic properties, which aid in building muscle tissue. Saw Palmetto Berries have also been explored in the treatment of prostate gland enlargement, where it is believed to aid with urinary flow and otherwise be of use as a preventative measure. Some herbalists also prescribe it in the treatment of chronic bronchitis, and general inflammation of the bladder. Cosmetically, the berries have been involved in treatment and study of hair loss prevention.

 

2oz $3.95
$24.95
$2.95

Schisandra Berries, whole

Native to East Asia, Schisandra Berries are commonly known as "Wu wei zi" in Chinese, which translates as "Five flavor fruit." This is because of their long history of use within Traditional Chinese Medicine, where Schisandra Berries are valued for having the five flavors traditionally used to treat ailments. Within this ancient traditions the are frequently valued as an antidepressant, aphrodisiac, and a useful boost to stamina.

Within more modern herbal practices, Schisandra Berries are perhaps most traditionally used to help resist infections and coughs. They are also occasionally used in treating insomnia or in products for skin health. Some studies have also shown them of use in treating viral hepatitis and otherwise protecting the liver.

 

1oz $3.95

$39.95

$3.95

Scullcap, cut

Known commonly in some circles as mad-dog skullcap, Scutellaria laterifolia, or Madweed, Scullcap was popularized among early Americans. Among them, it received these nicknames from the fact that it was widely considered a surefire cure for rabies, or hydrophobia as it is sometimes called. It is this purpose for which it is most widely known, though Scullcap has also seen common use as a sedative and a tranquilizer. Because of these qualities, it can now commonly be found in alternative smoke blends, where the sedative properties aid those who are seeking relaxation and peaceful contemplation. Some spiritual practices have also associated Scullcap with ritual and spells involving everlasting fidelity and commitment.

While Scullcap's use in treating hydrophobia (rabies) is still up to some debate, some herbalists have also found other medicinal uses for the herb. These use it commonly in the treatment of hysteria and convulsions, as well as in cases of rickets. In general, many herbalists apply it to all disorders of the nervous system, and suggest it as a remedy specifically for epilepsy. They also utilize it in easing nervous tension or helping those with insomnia get to sleep. There is also some experimentation in using scullcap to aid in lessening the withdrawal symptoms that come with substance abuse.

 

4oz $1.95

1 lb $2.50

5lbs $5.95

$0.95

Sea Salt, course

Found in the process of the evaporation of seawater, Sea Salt has seen centuries of use among coastal communities for use in cooking and cosmetics. In cooking, the mineral content often provides a different flavor than found in ordinary table salt, and because of this one can sometimes find Sea Salt used in its stead within Gourmet cooking and in specialized potato chips, particularly in the kettle cooked variety. Sea salt was also an important part of the economic situation for some communities, dating as far back as the Roman Empire, where it was often paired with another market, such as cattle distribution, to create a combined product such as salted beef to increase the value of both products. A product of the sea, Sea Salt has long been associated with magic and mysticism. Within these practices it is sometimes used as a wash for magical scrying mirrors, as well as parts of consecration and purification rituals. It is also sometimes used in protective magic and ritual, as well as for the cleansing and purification of crystals.

Aside from the frequent culinary use, Sea Salt is perhaps most commonly used today in baths and washes, often used to sooth away aches and pains or otherwise aid in wounded and damaged tissues. Indeed, from this comes the name "bath salts."

 

2oz $1.95
$3.95
$1.95

Sea Salt, fine

The dead sea is a unique feature of the world. Not only is it a landlocked sea but it contains ten times the salt of any other body of water in the world. What's more, it is found at the center of the "Holy Land," a region that has given rise to a wide range from the ancient Zoroastrianism and Judaism to Islam and Christianity. The result is a local that shows up often in various mythologies and legends, that has become a popular health spa due to its waters unique properties.

As a result, the salts collected from the Dead Sea have also become popular world wide as part of skin care and curative products. It is widely believed to help stimulate blood circulation when used in baths and soaks, and is often used to aid with common skin ailments such as acne or psoriasis. Many also use it to relieve allergic reactions. Remarkably, dead sea salt has also shown to be of use in treating aging skin, reducing wrinkle depth measurably.

 

2oz $2.95
$11.95
$1.95

Senna, whole

Coming from flowering plants that are often used in ornamentation or landscaping gardens, Senna leaves, or Folium Sennae, can be found often in Southeastern Asian cuisine. In this it is often used pickled in brine or fresh, and often as a flavoring agent in curry dishes. Known for millennia in folk medicine and herbalism, Senna leaf has a long standing as useful in herbal tonics, with some even having famous (or notorious) names such as the Black Draught, Daffy's Elixer and Swedish Bitters. Today, it can sometimes be found in diet teas where it is used both to decrease appetite and function as a laxative, sometimes resulting in rapid or dangerous weight loss.

More traditionally, Senna leaf has been used in Japanese Kampo medicine as well as traditional Chinese Medicine, where it is often viewed as a purgative, or an agent used to cause another to vomit. More modernly, the leaf has also been used as a laxative, with study showing that it can be useful in constipation, where it increases the movements of the colon and thereby aids in digestive processes.

 

1oz $4.95
$60.95
$4.95

Shark Cartilage Powder

Shark cartilage, the material that composes the skeletal structure of sharks, is rapidly becoming a popular dietary supplement as well as the center of much controversy. At the heart of this is the claim of many herbalists and nutritionists that shark cartilage is a potent aid in fighting cancer. Those who dispute this are often part of the scientific community, who claim that there is not enough evidence to support these theories. One of the reasons that the curative and medicinal properties of shark cartilage is so often disputed is the frequent use in the debate of the mistaken, and often repeated, belief that sharks do not get cancer. As a portion of the actual shark, some traditions also hold that shark cartilage can spiritually aid in achieving the properties of a shark, including their ferocity, cunning and vigor.

In fighting cancer, Shark cartilage is said to possess antioxidant qualities that aid in removing some of the particles that attack and destroy cells from the body. Beyond this, it is also believed that shark cartilage possesses anti-angiogenic properties, which can help prevent tumor growth. Outside of these possible benefits, shark cartilage is also often revered as an anti inflammatory, which can aid with treating arthritis and other such joint pain.

 

2oz $3.95
$14.95
$2.95

Shavegrass, cut

Known also as Horsetail, Shavegrass (Equisetum Arvense) is a widely popular herb within traditional herbalism, appearing in ancient lore throughout Europe and China, and it is still distributed widely across the globe today. Folklore holds that it is particularly beneficial to the urinary track, aiding with digestive disorders and feminine problems. Within both traditional Chinese Medicine and European herblore was also considered of great use in treating bleeding wounds and ulcers of the digestive track and external body.

Modern herbalist and lore suggests that Shavegrass possesses astringent qualities, and can be used as a wash for the eyes or topical wounds. It is still also prescribed for female problems, urinary infection, kidney stones, and even bed wedding, and is considered useful in helping to close wounds or sores due to its tannin content. Interestingly, experts also suggest that its high silica content may also make it useful in preventing osteoporosis.

 

1oz $2.95
$29.95
$2.95

Sheep Sorrel, cut

Known also by the names of Rumex acetosella, red sorrel, sour weed, and field sorrel, Sheep Sorrel is a plant native to North America, and can be commonly found in fields, grasslands, and woodlands. Widely considered by most to be a troublesome weed, it can also be found in culinary and landscaping practices. In culinary practices, it is often used as a garnish, or as a tart flavoring agent that has been used to curdle cheese. The leaves also have a tangy, lemon-flavor that has sometimes been used in salads. Some landscapers have also used it helping to prevent soil erosion, as the hearty plants can often sprout where others have a hard time taking root. In native Ojibwa medicine, it was also used as part of a folk treatment known as Essiac, which was used to treat cancer.

Modern herbalist traditions find Sheep Sorrel to be quite useful in treating inflammation and diarrhea. Some also hold that it is quite useful in treating fevers as well, and even afflictions such as scurvy. The leaves and stems are often used to make a tea, used as a diuretic, which also has astringent properties. Some traditions also hold that it can be used as a vermifuge to expel intestinal parasites, and still make great claim that it Sheep Sorrel can be a potent aid in fighting cancer.

 

2oz $3.95
$17.95
$2.95

Shepard's Purse, cut

Shepard's Purse (Capsella Bursa pastoris) is named for its small pods, which resemble the purses worn on the belts of medieval men. Often growing in fields as a feed supplement for grazing animals, its popularity has grown throughout the world. It is particularly favored in Asia, where it is used for food throughout parts of China and within Japan, where it is used in the dish Nanakusa-no-sekku; a traditional food eaten in ritual once a year for good health and long life.

Within herbal practice, it is valued for its ability to stop hemorrhaging. This application is known within herbal traditions for being particularly effective in stepping issue with the stomach, lungs, uterus, and kidneys. Similarly, it is sometimes used to treat external wounds.

 

1oz $2.95
$33.95
$2.95

Slippery Elm Bark Powder

Slippery Elm (Ulmus rubra) is a tree native to North America that can grow over sixty feet in height. It possesses a rich red heartwood that most likely gave it its common name "Red Elm" and it can also be found under the names of Gray Helm, Soft Elm, Moose Elm and Indian Elm, and is perhaps most closely related to the European Wych Elm. Its fibrous bark has made it popular for a variety of uses ranging from the creation of twine, rope, thread, and even bows strings. The wood is also popular in making sturdy wood structures, and was popular for wagon wheels due to its interlocking grain which can better absorb shocks.

In modern usage its bark has become popular as a powder which is then often used as a tea. The tea is said to be good herbal remedy for soothing the digestive tract, and is even considered by some to be a useful treatment for easing Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis. It has also been used to treat diarrhea, cough, and sore throat, and is sometimes used externally for wounds and burns.

 

1oz $2.95
$26.95
$2.95

Soapwort, cut

Native to Southern Europe and parts of Asia, Soapwort (or Saponaria ocymoides) is a commonly cultivated flower, that is renowned for the fact that it grows in nearly any soil or condition and will still produce brilliant blooms. Its name comes from the fact that the crushed leaves and root have been used in the production of soap for centuries. Indeed, the soap (and fine shampoo) is still created and used today, particularly in the care of delicate fabrics, such as those that might be maintained by museum curators. Of old, Soapwort was also recognized for medicinal qualities that included the treating of gout, rheumatism, eczema, cold sores, acne, and other skin treatments.

More modern herbalists prescribe Soapwort as a diaphoretic, to cause sweating, or a a diuretic to aid in urinary tract issues. It has also been used as an expectorant in treating coughs and colds, as well as a purgative, or in treating itchy skin. Most commonly however, Soapwort remains most commonly used in obtaining soap.

 

1oz $4.95
$52.95
$4.95

Solomon's Seal, cut

A relative Lily of the Valley, Solomon's Seal (or Polygonatum biflorum) is popular in gardens, and is native to Northern Europe and Siberia. It gets its name from the fact that when the root is cut traversely, markings can be observed within the fibers that somewhat resemble Hebrew script. This resulted in the rise of folklore that believed that King Solomon himself observed the value of this root to man and medicine, and so set his seal to it as testimony to its value. The root was indeed also applied to medicinal purposes, and was used often as a treatment for consumption (known today as tuberculosis). In spiritual traditions, the root is sometime associated with having properties similar to actual magical seals for the purposes of spells and rituals, and as such is often used for love potions, protective magic, and other such traditions.

Herbalist traditions find Solomon's Seal Root useful as a tonic for aiding with digestive issues, including inflammation of the stomach and bowels, and even dysentery. The root is also sometimes powdered and used in a poultice that is used for aiding in the treatment of bruises, piles, general inflammation, as well as cuts and sores.

 

2oz $2.95

$13.95

$1.95

Spearmint, cut

Known and revered for centuries, Spearmint (or Mentha spicata) is native to Europe and Southeast Asia, and is found to be an invasive species in the Great Lakes region of the United States. Herbalists often grow spearmint in pots and planters, as the roots can be intrusive and disruptive of the soil around where they grow. Perhaps most famously used in culinary applications, Spearmint is common to a wide range of foods, desserts, and beverages, and has been used to flavor liquors, teas, confectionaries, and even toothpaste. Of old, the Romans used it to invigorate the mind and stir the appetite, and even used it in a fashion similar to the way that we use smelling salts.

Herbalists today prescribe Spearmint for a wide variety of medical ailments, particular among children. Among children it is often used as a gentle aid in treating stomach aches, hiccups, and flatulence. It is also sometimes used in creating a gargle that is used to prevent gum disease, and whiten teeth. Some herbalists also use it as a mild diuretic and anti inflammatory, or even a fever reducer.

 

1oz $4.95
$53.95
$4.95

Spikenard Root, cut

Known simply as Nard commonly, Spikenard Root (Aralia Racemosa) is an herb from the Valerian family that has been used for thousands of years. Most commonly, an oil is extracted from the root that has been used to create perfumes and incense for thousands of years. Indeed it was sold throughout Ancient Egypt, Greece, the Mid East, and Rome as a part of a perfume called Nardium. It is famous as well as one of the 11 sacred Holy herbs used in incense in the High Temple of Jerusalem and as being used to anoint the body of Patroklos as a perfume by Achilles within the Illiad.

Within Ayurvedic Medicine and modern herbal practice it is generally hailed as a nerve tonic that makes a great sedative. In this way it is sometimes used to treat sleep disorders. There is some evidence that it may aid in balancing the menstrual cycle as well. Topically, it is also believed to be of great use in treating allergies and skin rashes.

 

1oz $3.95
$41.95
$3.95

Spirulina Powder

Actually a variety of blue-green Algae, Sprulina powder is composed of a collection of single celled, spiral shaped organisms. It has an incredible ability to survive in a wide range of environments, manyof which are too extreme for even many other varieties of Algae. Interestingly its cell walls are also not made up of cellulose as in other algae, but are in fact composed of complex sugars and proteins. Most frequently it is seen appearing almost as a jelly with a rich blue-green tone

Herbalists highly value Spirulina before meals as it is believed to aid with nutrient absorption. It is also popular among athletes and body builders as it can help improve stamina and strength. It is also sometimes prescribe to pregnant women for similar reasoning. Some studies, including those done by the FDA, have indicated that it can help lower blood glucose and lower harmful fat levels, making it useful in treating diabeties.

 

1oz $4.95
$52.95
$4.95

Squaw Vine Powder

Native to North America, Squaw Vine (Mitchella Repens) is known by a variety of names, including Canada Tea, Deer Berry, and Mountain Tea. Growing primarily in shady places under trees and shrubs in dry forests and flowering in the middle of summer, its leaves stay green year-round. It is most popular among herbalists these days due to medical lore passed down from Native American tribes.

In herbal medicine, Squaw vine is typically prescribed during the last weeks of pregnancy to help reduce labor pains. After labor it is also often utilized to ease the pain that one might experience during lactation. Some herbalists also believe that Squaw vine is useful in relieving pain during the menstrual cycle. Traditions also hold that it is useful in treating diarrhea, dysentery, and similar problems in both genders.

 

2oz $3.95

$20.95

$2.95

St. John's Wort, cut

St. John's Wort, or Hypericum perforatum has been held in ancient traditions that have long associated it with powerful protective magic as well as a potent medicinal aid. In the oldest of traditions, it is seen as a powerful ward against evil spirits and magic, and has been used in this way as a component in exorcism rituals, as well as in spells of ritual protection. It is also often said that St. John's Wort also has the power to instill courage and invisibility, and is a powerful aid in spells of divination. In driving away evil spirits, it is also said to aid in alleviating depression and sorrow.

Modern studies have explored St. John's Wort and found it to be a significant aid in treating depression. Results even indicated that it was potentially as useful as standard antidepressant medications while possessing less of the side effects. Because of this, it is also sometimes used in treating alcoholism. There is also some speculation that it can be used to ease the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Herbalists of old have also applied St. John's Wort to the healing of wounds, and the treatment of colds, insomnia, and headaches.

 

2oz $3.95

$20.95

$2.95

Anise, Star ~ The eastern cousin to the western spice, Anise, Anise Star can also be heard commonly referred to as Illicium verum, star aniseed, badian, chinse star anise, and badiana. The fruit of a small tree that originated in Vietnam and China, it is now produced almost exclusively in China. Not to be confused with Japanese Star Anise, which is often used to make incense, Chinese Star Anise (or simply Anise Star), has long been held in Traditional Chinese Medicine as a potent aid in soothing and curing long-lingering colds , as well for its use in soothing flatulence, helping with digestion, and aiding with illness associated with the urinary track, such as kidney stones. To this end, the fruit was sometimes chewed after dinner in china both as an aid for bad breath as well as to aid in digestion as described above.

More modern uses for this wonderful, star-shaped fruit have adhered quite closely to the uses known to older Chinese medicine. Today, the seeds are still chewed after a meal to aid with digestion, and it has spread in use to cooking, and is known as a common ingredient in Chinese, Indian, Malay-Indonesian, and Vietnamese dishes. It is also widely used to treat colds and similar illnesses, and is actually used to produce a key ingredient for a well known, modern cold medicine.

 

1oz $3.95

$35.95

$3.95

Stone Root Powder

Stone Root (Collinsonin Canadenis) is said to get its name from one of two origins. The first, and most obvious, is from the rock-hard nature of the root of the plant. The other is said to be from its use in treating gallstones and kidney stones, which was collectively referred to as "The Stone," among the frontiersmen afflicted with it. The plant itself possesses a strong lemon scent and is related to the mint family. Native American tribes, and pioneers after, were known to use it in treating cuts and wounds.

Modern herbalism still recognizes it for these purposes, and Stone Root is sometimes used in a poultice for bruises, cuts, and sores. More commonly it is used in the treatment of kidney stones and fluid retention. As a diuretic, it can help ease the pain associated with these conditions or otherwise alleviate the problem.

 

2oz $3.95
$19.95
$2.95

Strawberry Leaf, cut

Indigenous to Europe and grown throughout the world, the strawberry plant is most recognized for the sweet red berries it produces of the same name. Less frequently considered are the properties of the leaves. Within traditional herb lore, they are known to possess a range of medicinal properties that are generally universal across all varieties of the plant.

Commonly mixed into a poultice or in bath waters, strawberry leaf is commonly used topically to ease aches and pains. It is also said to be useful in this manner for treating rashes, or even the pain of arthritis. It is sometimes used as a tea or tonic as a gentle remedy for diarrhea or to assist when there is difficulty with urination.

 

4oz $3.95
$11.95
$1.95

Sulfur Powder (Brimstone)

Sulfur Powder has been known in its natural form since the 6th century BC among in China. With the evolution of traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese Taoists began to experiment in using it in their treatments and understanding of the world. Reference was also found from a later Song Dynasty Military Treatise, which speaks of many different formulas in which Sulfur Powder was used to create Black Powder which was in turned used in warfare. In Europe, Sulfur was valued highly enough to be given its own Alchemical Symbol, consisting of a triangle at the top of a cross. It was also well known as Brimstone, a word derived from biblical texts, and was often associated with damnation and hell. Spiritual traditions exist around Sulfur as well, depicting it as a powerful aid in preventing hexes or destroying an enemy's power over you.

Herbalists and folk lore predating modern science holds sulfur powder to be a potent medical skin treatment. For this purpose it was usually used in the creation of a cream which was intended to alleviate psoriasis, eczema, and acne.

 

1oz $3.95
$36.95
$3.95

Suma Powder

Suma Powder (Pfaffia paniculata), derived from the Suma plant as you might have guessed, is native to South American. Though it is most commonly known as a food source within the dense forests throughout Brazil, Peru, Ecuador, and Venezuela, Suma has also been explored medicinally by indigenous peoples for thousands of years and is a valued part of their herbal folklore.

Modern usage and study has shown that Suma powder can be used as an adaptogen, which has resulted in it being referred to as "Brazilian Ginseng." In this capacity, Suma powder is generally prescribe to help resist fatigue, improving stamina and endurance. As many other adaptogens it is also said to help improve the body's reaction to stressful situations. Studies are also being explored to see if Suma powder is of use in treating Epstein-Barr disease and Chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

1oz $3.95
$3.95

Tarragon Leaf, cut

Native to the Northern Hemisphere, Tarragon (Artemisia Dracunulus) is famous throughout the world as a favored herb used within French cuisine. Indeed, it is regarded as one of the "four fine herbs" of French cooking and as such appears within a wide range of dishes for its flavoring. It is also sometimes known to appear within salads or cooked as an asparagus substitute.

Herbalists see Tarragon s being useful medically as well, and may find it referred to as Dragon's Wort or Dragon Herb as well. It is generally considered to be useful in relieving gastric difficulties and bowel complaints, and has been studied for its ability to improve liver function. Some have also utilized Tarragon to stimulate appetite and induce sleep. Those with herb gardens may also enjoy its use as it is said that the scent and taste can discourage some garden pests.

 

2oz $2.95
$12.95
$1.95

Thyme Leaf, whole

Thyme has a long history of being used by man in everything from cooking practices to ancient, sacred rites. In Ancient Greece, it was used in baths or burned as incense in temples, and it was believed to be a powerful source of courage. Egyptians used it as well, frequently employing it in their embalming rites. Among the later Romans, it was also used to purify rooms and even flavor cheese. Later still, in the mid ages, traditions held that thyme be placed beneath pillows to help some fall to sleep and ward off nightmares. Women also gave it to knights, clinging to the ancient belief that the leaves could provide courage. It was also used in funerary rites of the time, and was laid upon coffins to aid in the passage to the next life. Today, however, it is slipped away from most of these spiritual practices, and is most commonly found as a basic ingredient in a wide range of cultural dishes.

Modern herbalists find that thyme leaves and oil contain a large volume of a chemical that can be used widely as an antiseptic. Indeed, this chemical is the main active ingredient in the popular mouthwash Listerine. Prior to antibiotics, Thyme was sometimes used to medicate bandages. It was also used for the treatment of coughs and bronchitis and other respiratory infections, and in this case was used as a gargle, salve, or syrup.

 

1oz $4.95
$65.95
$4.95

Tongkat Ali Powder

Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma alungifolis), or Pasak Bumi as it is also known, is actually a tree that can grow over 30 feet in height and is native to Indonesia and Malaysia, as well as Thailand, Vietnam and Laos. Traditionally, it was known for being used in antimalarial, aphrodisiac, anti diabetic, antimicrobial, and antipyretic action, though in more recent years it has been primarily known for its aphrodisiac qualities, particularly in Malaysia. There, it has been used for quite some time primarily to increase libido in men, and increase male energy and stamina.

In most modern and commercial use, Tongkat appears in a wide range of "male enhancement" products. It is widely known for increasing male sexual desire, sexual performance, and general well being. Physical trainers and athletes will also sometimes use Tongkat Ali to safely increase testosterone levels for increased muscle mass and muscle definition.

 

2oz $4.95
$25.95
$2.95

Tribulus Terrestris Powder

Commonly referred to as Puncturevine, Caltrop, cathead, yellow vine, or goathead, Tribulus Terrestris is a plant that sprouts in a sprawling pattern, and produces seeds known sprouting 2-3 large spines. Native to southern Europe, Southern Asia, throughout Africa and within Australia, the plant is well known throughout the world and, where it is not native, is often regarded as somewhat of a pest. Despite this, however, it has been used for quite some time throughout western herblore, traditional Chinese medicine, and Ayurvedic practice.

Within these traditional practices, Tribulus Terrestris is widely considered to be useful in treating infertility, erectile dysfunction, and low libido, as has been the case since it was first fully utilized within such medicinal practice. Original studies at first indicated that these improvements were largely due to an increase in testosterone production but recent studies show that Tribulus does not actually effect sex hormone production at all. Hotly debated, Tribulus is also sometimes used as a sports enhancement supplement, with conflicting studies debating whether it offers any positive result to muscle growth and endurance.

 

1oz $3.95
$40.95
$3.95

Tyrosine Powder

Tyrosine (L-Tyrosine) powder is actually a supplement containing the non essential amino acid Tyrosine. This amino acid plays an important role in nearly all proteins found within the human body, and is needed for proper function of the thyroid, pituitary, and adrenal glands. When levels of Tyrosine are low it can result in fatigue and slow metabolism, and as a supplement it is often taken simply to stimulate alertness and mental activity.

Tyrosine powder is often rescribed to aid with depression, and there have been a variety of clinical studies exploring its use in treating more serious illness. It has shown value in treating Parkinsin's disease within testing, as well as in treating Alzheimer's disease. Tyrosine has also displayed value as a treatment for schizophrenia and dementia.

 

2oz $4.95

$25.95

$2.95

Valerian

Sometimes referred to as All-Heal, Valerian Root, or Valeriana officinalis in Latin, is native to Europe and parts of Asia, and has been introduced to North American soils. Among the ancient Greeks and Romans, it was treated as a medicinal herb of great virtue, with much mention by the esteemed physicians Hippocrates and Galen, whose works have formed the foundation for much of modern medicine. Some lore also holds that it is quite useful in rites of purification and protection, particularly when seeking to ward against the magic of your enemies. Indeed, in Sweden it was tradition for Valerian Root to be placed in the clothing of the Groom, to ward off the evil attentions of envious Elves.

Among modern herbalists Valerian Root is a popular sleep aid and dietary supplement. It is often used in treating sleeping disorders, restlessness, and anxiety and even as a muscle relaxant. Though it often takes weeks to fully being working, immediate beneficial effects are sometimes observed. Some herbalists also use it in treating digestive issues, ranging from stomach pain to irritable bowel syndrome. Though it is most frequently used as a sedative, some studies have also shown that it can sometimes stimulate those who are fatigue, and possible night terrors among those who do not digest it well.

 

1 bean $2.95
1/4lb $58.95
$2.95

Vanilla Bean, whole

nilla Bean, or vanilla planifolia, is often referred to as the fruit of the vanilla plant, though in truth it is neither a fruit nor a bean. It is in fact the dried seed pod, presenting an appearance of an elongated stalk. Both the stalk and the seed of this plant produce its delightful, sweet fragrance and flavor. For this reason it is commonly used in culinary practices throughout the world, perhaps most notably in vanilla ice cream. Vanilla is also quite frequently found in the creation of aromatherapy fragrances and perfumes, and has been known for centuries as an aphrodisiac that can help stir desire and lust.

Of old, vanilla was considered to be of use in treating fevers and other such illness, but today it is mostly used within the culinary arts. While some consider its ability to act as an aphrodisiac somewhat of a myth, some studies have indeed shown that it can increase hormone levels related to desire.

 

2oz $3.95

$20.95

$2.95

Vervain, cut

Vervain, or Verbena hastata, has long been known in herbalism and folk medicine, perhaps most commonly as an herbal tea. In Ancient Egypt it was known as Tears of Isis, and in Greece it was referred to as "Juno's Tears," both referring to the divine qualities that it was believed to have. The Romans used it as well, often placing it on altars of Jupiter in sacrifice, and considered it among the most potent of sacrificial herbs. Early Christian lore also spoke of Vervain being applied to the wounds of Jesus after he was removed from the cross, and from this medieval lore also speaks of it being referred to as Holy Herb or Devil's Bane. Some traditions also hold that it offers powerful protection against vampires, and other evil spirits, and it sees this use frequently still in some parts of Italy. When introduced to North America, the Native American Pawnee took it up and found use for it in reaching religious states as well as using it to better fathom their dreams.

Medicinally, Vervain was at one point considered to be a great treatment for up to 30 different ailments. Today, most herbalists simply believe it to be good for fevers and ulcers, with some also thinking it an aid in treating pleurisy and other such ailments. Others still have used it in creating poultices, particularly for the treatment of headaches and rheumatism.

 

2oz $3.95
$23.95
$2.95

Wheat Grass, Powder

Used for both human and animal consumption, Wheatgrass, or Triticum aestivum, is often viewed with a positive light ranging from seeing wheatgrass as being a great nutritional supplement to seeing wheatgrass to possess unique curative properties. It was not popularized in the western world until the 1930s, where a man experimenting with it used it to nurse dying chickens back to life. Not only did they recover, but they then began to produce eggs at a higher rate than the otherwise healthy hens. Since then, it has grown into somewhat of a phenomenon within herbal communities, and is treated almost as a cure-all. Indeed, for a time it was claimed that Wheatgrass had a greater supply of nutrients that we need than regular vegetables, though it has since been proven that the comparison is actually about equal, with Wheatgrass possessing a large amount of Vitamin B.

Studies on wheatgrass have shown that it can aid in increasing red blood cell counts even as it lowers blood pressure. Some herbalists also see it as being useful in cleansing blood and organs, and aiding in digestion by cleansing the gastrointestinal tract. Some also believe that it can stimulate the thyroid gland, aiding in correcting obesity. Others still have begun to explore it as a detoxifier, helping to remove toxins and heavy metals from the body, and even as a tumor fighter or cancer prevention treatment, though such studies are as yet inconclusive.

 

2oz $2.95
$15.95
$1.95

White Oak Bark, cut

Native to England and Naturalized to the US, oak trees can grow as tall as 100 feet tall and are reported to live as long as a thousand years old. Older by still are the legends and uses that have been passed down through lore, concerning these ancient and majestic trees. The Celts long held the belief that Oak is the tree of doors, that can be used as the gateway between worlds as well as a place where portals could be erected. The Norse held oak to be sacred to Thor, perhaps due to how often the tall trees were struck by lightning. Similarly the ancient Greeks also revered it as a sacred symbol of Zeus. Native Americans of old used to gather the acorns of the trees, and use them to grind into flour or store as provisions to help them through the winter, while the bark was used by tanners in the preparation and tanning of leather.

Today, while the wood is often used for fine furniture and cabinetry, the bark is actually being explored as a healthy dietary supplement. It contains vitamin B12, as well as the minerals of calcium, iron and zinc, and has been used often in natural skin creams. Some herbalists also believe white oak bark, or Quercus alba, is useful in treating ulcers, spleen problems, and diarrhea. Indeed, old herbalists' lore often refers to a tea that was brewed from the bark for the treatment of internal bleeding. Externally, there are wide variety of uses, including the treatment of rashes, skin infections, swollen glands, sores and similar such ailments.

 

2oz $3.95
$16.95
$2.95

White Pine Bark, cut

The state tree of both Maine and Michigan as well as the Provincial Tree of Ontario, the White pine is the tallest evergreen tree native to Eastern North America. Treasured for its beauty and the hint of green it offers when everything else is draped in white in the winter, its bark has also been explored by native peoples medicinally for hundreds of years. Interestingly, similar uses of the bark of other species have also been used within Traditional Chinese Medicine as well.

Herbalists have traditionally used White Pine Bark to treat colds and coughs for ages. As an expectorant it can be used as a component in a variety of treatments that helps to loosen and expel phlegm and mucous. Some have also used it to increase circulation, and studies have shown it to be nature's second largest source of the potent antioxidants called proanthocyanidins.

 

2oz $2.95

$13.95

$1.95

White Willow Bark, cut

Used for thousands of years, White Willow (or Salix alba in Latin) bark has long been recognized as a powerful aid in medical treatments and mystical ritual. The ancient physician Hippocrates, who wrote in 400 BC, even spoke of chewing it to reduce fever and inflammation. Its use extended into China and ancient Egypt and Assyria, as well where its healing properties were also recognized for centuries, often as an aid against all varieties of aches and pains. In the mid ages it was applied to fever as well. In many mystic and spiritual traditions, it is also associated with the moon, and trying to bring the moon's blessings into your life. In this it has also been applied to spells of healing and binding.

Today, White Willow bark is primarily used in the treatment of pain. It actually contains salica, which was used in the 1800s to develop aspirin, and numerous other compounds believed to aid in treating similar issues as Aspirin, such as headaches, fever, and inflammation. While slower to act than taking an aspirin, its effects seem to last longer. Some herbalists also claim that White Willow bark can be used for its antiseptic qualities, and even immune boosting properties.

 

1oz $3.95

$47.95

$3.95

Wild Lettuce Leaf, cut

Often found written of under the Latin name of Lactuca virosa, as well as the names Bitter Letuce and Opium Lettuce, Wild Lettuce Leaf was widely used in the 19th century among many doctors as a sedative when opium could not be used. It also experienced a resurgence of popularity in the 1970s, where it was widely used recreationally for those psychotropic properties it possesses that are similar to opium, despite the fact that the leaf contains no opiates. The greens are also sometime harvested and added to salads, with the leaves having a somewhat more bitter taste. Wild Lettuce Leaf was also often used among Native Americans as part of rituals, where it helped to achieve visions and trance states, as well as aided in more vivid dreams.

Medicinally, many herbalists still prescribe it as an anesthetic and sleep aid. The oils extracted from the leaf are sometimes used in a tea to aid in sleep, with other drinks sometimes being fashioned for this purpose by soaking the leaves in alcohol. Recreationally, wild lettuce leaf is also quite popular in alternative smoking blends, where the psychotropic and sedative qualities help the smoker relax.

 

2oz $3.95
$16.95
$2.95

Wintergreen, cut

Wintergreen is the name commonly applied to plants whose leave remain green throughout the winter as well as the rest of the year. Native Americans would carefully harvest the leaves, taking care to only take a little so that the plants could regenerate. They would commonly brewed tea from these leaves, seeing it as a powerful aid in treating rheumatic symptoms, headaches, fevers sore throats and other such ailments involved with the common cold and general illness. Later, during the American Revolution, Wintergreen was used by the early Americans as a substitute for tea, which had become scarce during the war. Today, it is quite commonly seen as a flavoring agent for toothpaste, chewing gum, soft drinks, confectionaries and numerous other commercial products.

Many herbalists still see Wintergreen as a potent aid in medicinal herbalism. They frequently use it in treating joint and muscle pain as an anti inflammatory, as well as an antiseptic and an agent for soothing and easing digestion. Some have also prescribed it as an agent that can sooth colic and treat excessive gas in infants, while otherwise being useful in treating bacterial infections of the skin.

 

2oz $4.95
$31.95
--

White Sage

Also known as Salvia Alpine, Bee Sage, or Sacred Sage, white sage has a long history of being revered for medicinal practices, and has long been viewed as possessing many virtues believed to aid in maintaining general well being. It is perhaps better known though for the spiritual practices that revolve around it, particularly the spiritual art of smudging. In this practice, white sage is usually the preferred herb used to bundle up into a long stick or wand. One end is then lit to smolder slowly, as the smudging stick is then used in ceremonial offering, or in rituals of cleansing, purification, and protection. This tradition, born of Native American beliefs, is said to keep away evil spirits and negative energies, and has been adapted to the practices of many neopagan traditions. Within these practices, the uses often extend to seeking prosperity, fertility and longevity, and are sometimes used in rituals of money drawing, banishing, or consecration.

Herbalists often speak of the medicinal properties that White Sage possesses aiding in decreasing sweating and salivation. It is also said to aid in ailments of the nose and throat and lungs by decreasing the mucus secretions of the sinuses. It is sometimes also used in a cold tea as a tonic for stomach ailments, or in look warm tea for soothing away the pain of a sore throat. The leaves of white sage have also been said to be of great use for treating heavy menstruation, though it should be noted that this can sometimes decrease lactation.

 

2oz $5.95
$35.95
$3.95

Witches Grass, cut

Also found under the names of Panicum capillare, Hair Grass, Panic Grass, Tickle Grass, and Tumble Grass, Witches Grass is actually related to the famed tumble weed. Native to North America, it is considered among many to be an invasive weed that grows in sandy or gravelly terrain, in dry conditions, and can reach a height of 1 to 3 feet tall, and possesses very few branches. This leaves it sometimes sprouting from patios and driveways and other such inconvenient places. Outside of this reputation of being somewhat of a nuisance, Witches Grass has also long had a reputation for possessing spiritual properties.

In mystic and occult traditions, Witches Grass is often seen to be an herb related to the sign of Jupiter, and is therefore often used in rituals either as a representation of Jupiter or in seeking to achieve some of the sign's powers. Often this results in the plant being used in spells that are seeking happiness, better luck, or some other manner of aid in overcoming your obstacles. Because of the authority of Jupiter, Witches Grass is also sometimes used in aiding exorcisms.

1oz $3.95

$32.95

$3.95

Witch Hazel Bark, cut

tive to the Atlantic and North America, and cultivated in Europe and Asia, Witchhazel, or Hamamelis virginiana, saw a great deal of use medicinally among Native Americans. They believed it to be of use in a general tonic, brewed as a tea and used for treating anything from cuts to colds, from heavy menstruation to tumors. Indeed, they also frequently used the wood of the plant for other purposes; the name Witch hazel itself comes from the Anglo-Saxon word wych, meaning flexible, and was applied to the plant after observation of the Native Americans using it to make their bows.

In modern use, Witch hazel leaf is still viewed by many herbalists as possessing a wide array of beneficial properties. It is still proscribed commonly for relieving diarrhea and varicose veins, and inflammation of the mouth and throat. Most commonly though, its uses are topical, and include the relief of aching feet, wounds, burns (including sunburn, windburn, and other such environmental damage), the effects of poison ivy and even insect bites.


1oz $2.95

$28.95

$2.95

Witch Hazel Leaf, cut

Native to the Atlantic and North America, and cultivated in Europe and Asia, Witchhazel, or Hamamelis virginiana, saw a great deal of use medicinally among Native Americans. They believed it to be of use in a general tonic, brewed as a tea and used for treating anything from cuts to colds, from heavy menstruation to tumors. Indeed, they also frequently used the wood of the plant for other purposes; the name Witch hazel itself comes from the Anglo-Saxon word wych, meaning flexible, and was applied to the plant after observation of the Native Americans using it to make their bows.

In modern use, Witch hazel leaf is still viewed by many herbalists as possessing a wide array of beneficial properties. It is still proscribed commonly for relieving diarrhea and varicose veins, and inflammation of the mouth and throat. Most commonly though, its uses are topical, and include the relief of aching feet, wounds, burns (including sunburn, windburn, and other such environmental damage), the effects of poison ivy and even insect bites.

 

2oz $3.95

$21.95

$2.95

Wood Betony, cut

Often considered among the most important of Anglo-Saxon herbs, Wood Betony, or Stachys officinalis, was used widely of old in the creations of charms for amulets during the mid ages. These amulets were believed to ward off evil, and spirits, as well as the ill humors believed to bring disease and strife to the human body. From this origin, it was expanded upon by herbalists of the time, including the famed Gerard of the 1500's. The herbalists of the time frequently spoke of Wood Betony with the highest praise, viewing it as a cure for dozens of ailments if not as an outright cure all.

Today it is mostly used in folk medicine as an astringent, particularly in treating afflictions of the throat, mouth and gums. For this purpose you will most frequently find Wood Betony used as part of an herbal tea which is then used as a wash or gargle. Some studies have also shown that Wood Betony is quite helpful in lowering blood pressure, which also aids in treating headaches and anxiety.

 

1oz $3.95
$44.95
$3.95

Woodruff, cut

Native to Europe, North Africa and Asia, Woodruff has been called by the other names of Galium odoratum, Sweet Woodruff and Wild Baby's Breath. In German it has also been known as Waldmeister, which translates roughly into "Master of the woods." The herb is widely known for its strong, sweet scent that is actually derived from the chemical coumarin as it is produced in the herb, and grows stronger as it wilts, persisting after it is dried. Because of this, it is often used in potpourri and other such products. Of old, it was also used to flavor numerous products in Germany, such as May Wine, beer, brandy, sausages, jelly, jam and even ice cream. It is also sometimes used in spiritual traditions as an herb that possesses powers of healing.

Today it is most of often known in folk recipes and herbal traditions, where it is best known as an herb that can keep insects away, particularly in the preservation of linens where its sweet smell becomes imbued in the fabrics. Some herbalists also use to produce an herbal tea which is said to possess mild sedative properties. It should be noted however that the herb has been banned in Germany since 1981 for use in drinks and food, as some studies have shown it to possess a degree of toxicity when imbibed in large amounts.

 

2oz $2.95

$16.95

$1.95

Wormwood Cut

Commonly found in herbal texts and other documentation as Artemisia absinthium, or more commonly as absinthe wormwood, Wormwood is native to temperate Eurasia and Africa. In these locales it has seen a long history of use in keeping away pests and insect larvae, and has been used indoors as a repellant for fleas and moths. More famously, it has also been used in flavoring the notorious liquor called Absinthe, as well some other well known liquor such as bitters, vermouth and other, less well known wine and spirits. In the mid ages it was used to spice mead, and gets its name from this time as it was used in a common medieval cure for intestinal worms.

Today many herbalists know it as an aid for treating gastric pain and indigestion. It has also seen use as an antiseptic or in the treatment of fevers, where it is said to help reduce them. Some have even used it in teas for aiding with the labor pains of pregnant women. The oil of wormwood has also been used to improve circulation, and has long been prescribed by some herbalists as a general treatment for the ailments of the circulatory system.

Do not exceed more than 1/2 g. of dried herb in tea 2-3 times a day.

 

2oz $3.95
$20.95
$2.95

Wormwood, Powder (wildcrafted)

Commonly found in herbal texts and other documentation as Artemisia absinthium, or more commonly as absinthe wormwood, Wormwood originates in parts of Europe, Asia and Africa. In these regions where it is native, Wormwood powder has seen a long history of use in keeping away pests and insect larvae, and has been used indoors as a repellant for fleas and moths. Perhaps more notably though, it has also been used in flavoring the notorious liquor called Absinthe, as well some other well known liquor such as bitters, vermouth and other, less well known wine and spirits. In the mid ages it was used to spice mead, and gets its name from this time as it was used in a common medieval cure for intestinal worms.

Today many herbalists know it as an aid for treating gastric pain and indigestion. It has also seen use as an antiseptic or in the treatment of fevers, where it is said to help reduce them. Some have even used it in teas for aiding with the labor pains of pregnant women. The oil of wormwood has also been used to improve circulation, and has long been prescribed by some herbalists as a general treatment for the ailments of the circulatory system.

 

2oz $4.95
$31.95
$2.95

Xanthan Gum Powder

Created during the fermentation process of glucose or sucrose, Xanthan Gum is an interesting byproduct that has become most commonly used to increase the viscosity of liquid. In other words, it is a great thickener for your liquid blends. Within the commercial industry it is often found in salad dressing and sauces; xanthan gum is what allows the liquid to pour after it has been shaken and then grow more solid once it settles on your plate or in the bottle. It is also used to create textures in ice cream and within gluten-free baking to make gluten-free dough easier to work in the same fashion as wheat based flours. The cosmetics industry has also picked up on the use of Xanthan Gum, using very small amounts to help ensure that ingredients do not separate.

Within spiritual and herbal practices, this translates into a very useful tool for creating your own formulas, scents, lotions, and bath washes. A small amount of xanthan gum powder can help bind ingredients together and keep them from separating once you place them in the pantry or your bath's shelves.

 

2oz $3.95

$18.95

$2.95

Yarrow Flower

Yarrow Flower has a long history of use, dating back into antiquity. As such, it has acquired many names over the years, including Achilea millefolium, nosebleed plant, old man's pepper, sanguinary, milfoil, soldier's woundwort, thousand leaf, and thousand seal. As one might guess from the varied names, Yarrow Flower was often carried along with military armies on the march for the purpose of slowing and stopping the blood flow of wounds. Indeed, it was written that the Greek hero Achilles even carried it with his army to treat wounds. In the mid ages, the flower's use was extended further, and was a component Gruit, which was used to flavor beers before hops became prevalent. It was also used as a popular vegetable during the 17th century, with leaves providing a pleasant taste when they were used in a manner similar to spinach. Yarrow flowers are also often used in handfasting rituals and weddings, and are believed to be of use in spells of divination.

Today, interestingly, many herbalists have found Yarrow flower to be of great use in treating colds and influenza. There is also some evidence that it provides a positive impact on the circulatory, digestive, excretory, and urinary systems. Herbalists have also applied it in the treatment of allergies that involve mucus problems, perhaps most famously for hay fever.

 

2oz $2.95
$14.95
$1.95

Yellowdock Root, cut

Widely believed to possess mystical and medicinal properties in folklore, Yellowdock root is frequently viewed as possessing the power to reap great benefits upon those who use it. In mystical tradition, it is often believed that Yellowdock Root can be of great use for businesses and personal finances, and is often employed in ritual use to draw money into your personal or business life, and attract customers to a business front. When employed this way, the root is often boiled and brewed like a tea before being used in a manner quite similar to a floor wash. Other traditions hold the root to be of great aid in love spells, where it can be used as part of a wash or woven into a doll used to help attract the affection of the one that you desire.

In medicinal lore, Yellowdock has been held to be a blood purifier for some time. Within this belief, many herbalists use it in treating rheumatism, blood diseases, and chronic diseases of the skin such as psoriasis and eczema. Herbalists also frequently use it in preventing anemia or in regulating hormones. Some reports have been made as well of it being used in such extreme cases as the treatment of the bleeding of the lungs. Some study has also shown that the root can be used as a laxative, or even in eliminating intestinal parasites from the digestive system.

 

2oz $2.95
$16.95
$1.95

Yerba Mate Green, cut

Yerba Mate, or Ilex Paraguariensis, is hugely popular in South America, particularly Argentina, where many consider no day complete without a serving of Yerba Mate. There, it is served in a manner much like coffee or tea, and is steeped in hot water during the cold months while sometimes added to another drink, such as lemonade, during the warmer seasons. Indeed, a ritual of sorts has become quite associated with its drinking, where the host or provider brews the drink in a gourd for everyone who has gathered. Each person finishes the gourd, and returns it to the brewer who then passes it down the circle, clockwise. Once everyone has drunk, it begins again until all have had enough. In other cases, people simple gather to drink Yerba Mate in a fashion quite similar to American coffee shops.

Yerba Mate, when brewed, has been shown to contain caffeine along with other stimulants that can also be found in coffee and chocolate. Despite this, though it has not been chemically proven, many insist that it provides the energy boost and other such positive effects of caffeine without the negative, functioning somewhat as an energy drink without the drawbacks.. Many believe that despite the increased energy and willful wakefulness, one can still find sleep at will. Some studies have also shown Yerba mate to possess nutritional value akin to Green Tea, with the ability to stimulate the immune system and provide nutrients and antioxidants to the body.

 

1oz $3.95
$40.95
$3.95

Yohimbe Bark Powder

Coming from an evergreen tree in West Africa known as Pausinystalia yohimbe, Yohimbe Bark is a traditional treatment that dates back centuries among the indigenous peoples there. There, traditions hold that the bark is of great use in treating fever and coughs, and even leprosy, but lore most frequently holds that the bark is best used in increasing virility in men, and functioning as an aphrodisiac. From these traditions the use has spread, reaching into modern medicine. Indeed, 50 years before the modern drugs that you now see advertisements for throughout the US and other countries, Yohimbre bark extracts were being used in treating sexual problems for both men and women.

Today, modern herbalists use it most commonly for this purpose, particularly in increasing libido and aiding men who have erectile dysfunction. Some herbalists also use the bark as a supplement for weight loss, claiming that it can aid in losing weight though some scientific studies have disputed this. Yohimbe bark powder is also believed by some herbalists and lore to aid in relieving depression.

 

1oz $2.95
$28.95
$2.95

Yucca Root, cut

This versatile root has long been grown and cultivated for its many beneficial properties. Natives Americans have often viewed it as a great medicinal aid in treating irritation, pain and discomfort of the joints and skin. Some have also even used it to create soap. When peeled and cooked, the Yucca Root has also been used in culinary practices where it is cooked in a fashion much like a potato, or is used to thicken soup and stews. It has also seen use in being ground into flour, which has resulted in recent use as a replacement for wheat for those with wheat allergies.

Herbalists today find the Yucca Root useful in treating inflammation, such as in arthritis, rheumatism, bursitis, colitis, and other such ailments. Possessing a high content of vitamins, including vitamins A, B and C, as well as the minerals potassium, calcium, phosphorus, iron, manganese and copper, Yucca can also be found used a as health food supplement. This is particularly true among herbalists who sometimes prescribe it as an aid for bones, joints and muscles as the particular blend for minerals and vitamins makes for a potent aid to the structural systems of the body.

Smudges

Sage Spirit Smudge Sticks

 

 

Smudge Stick Variety pack

This is a sample pack of three different 5" smudge sticks chosen from the wide variety we have for in stock for all of your ritual needs. Sage and sweet grass, sage and lavender, and sage and cedar. $11.99


 

5" Smudge Sticks

These smudge sticks each combine sage with other scents into a thick 5" long bundle.

Sage and Cedar
Sage and Copal
Sage and Lavender
Sage and Pinion Pine
Sage and Sweetgrass
Choose your Herb

 

7" Smudge Sticks

Conventient and reusable, these individually packaged smudge stick mixes will suit all your smudging and cleansing needs. Each one comes in a 7" long bundle. $6.99 each

Desert Sage
Sage and Copal
Sage and Sweetgrass
Sage and Cedar
Sage and Lavender

Choose your Herb

 

Ancient Aromas Smudge Stick

3-packs

These fragrant smudge sticks blend the traditional age with other richly scented incense to create a delightful blend of fragrant smoke. Each pack contains three 4" smudge sticks, created with carefully wild-crafted herbs. $7.99

Cerimonial ~ mountain sage, cedar, sweetgrass
Dragon's Blood ~ mountain sage, dragon's blood
Mystic Gold ~ mountain sage, sage, frankinsence
Prosperity ~ mountain sage, pine, perfume sage
Stargate ~ mountain sage, white sage, rosemary, sweetgrass

Choose your Scent

Baby White Sage Smudge Stick 12-pack

Small "baby" white sage smudge sticks are the most popular smudge sticks offered for ritual blessings. Their small size allows for them to burn down without filling your home or sacred space with to much smoke. $28.99

 


 

Baby White Sage Smudge Stick 3-pack

Variety pack ~ white sage, hierba santa, mountain sage $7.49

 


 

Smudge Stick Blends

Created using all natural ingredients, the Kummeyaay Indians of Baja California and Mexico created these specially smudge sticks. Each stick measures approximately 5"-6" long.

Blessings ~ white sage and cedar $4.49
Ceremonial ~ Mountain Sage, cedar, sweetgrass $4.49
Dragon's Blood ~ Mountain Sage and Dragon's Blood $6.99
Dream Spirit ~ Mountain Sage, Perfume Sage, and Sweetgrass $4.49
Harmony ~ Mountain Sage, Sweetgrass, Cedar, Lavender $4.49
Healing ~ Mountain Sage, Copal and Cedar $4.49
Love and Happiness ~ Mountain Sage, White Sage and Lavender $4.49
Mystic Gold ~ Mountain Sage, Frankincense $4.49
Prosperity ~ Mountain Sage, Pine and Perfume Sage $4.49
Stargate ~ Mountain Sage, White Sage, Rosemary and Sweetgrass $4.49

Choose your Scent

New Age

White Sage Smudge Stick 6 pack

This 6 pack of white sage smudge sticks offers you six smudge sicks measuring approximately 1" in diamter and 5" long, though some variation does exist. $12.99

 


5" White Sage Smudge Stick

Gathered and bundled by the Kymeyaay Indians, this sage smudge stick is an authentic Native American product. it consists of wonderful California white sage budled and bound with string to be about 5" - 6" in length. $4.49

 


Magical Desert Sage Smudge Stick

This is a 3" long bundle of desert sage, perfect for your own smudging practices. $3.99


Smudge Stick 3 pack

Each of these packs comes withthree mini smudge sticks measuring approximately 4" - 6" in length, and 1"-1 1/2" in diameter. The variety pack contains cedar, white sage, and blue sage.

Blue Sage $7.99
Cedar $7.99
Variety pk. $7.99
White Sage $6.99

 

Choose your Scent

Cedar Smudge Sticks

Created entirely of bundled cedar tips, these cedar smudge sticks are perfect for blessings and rituals of purificatoin and cleansing. Measurments are approximately:

Large: $5.49 and Small: $3.99

 

Choose your Scent

Blue Sage Smudge Sticks

Composed entirely of blue sage, these smudge sticks offer an almost citrus fragrance, providing a lighter alternative to the traditional white sage.

Large: $5.49 and Small: $3.99

 

Choose your Size

Sweet Grass Braid

Hard to find, sweetgrass has been used in Native American ceremonies for generation.Traditionally used for smudging and purifying ceremonies. This herb smells fantastic as it burns. $11.99


Other Incense Accessories

Holland Charcoal Tablets

A foil package of 10 charcoal tablets. Long burning easy lighting. Packaged in foil tubes, well-sealed against moisture and dust.

33mm

Roll of 10 disks $3.99

Box of 8 rolls $$16.99

 

Chooses your size

40mm

Roll of 10 disks $4.99

Box of 8 rolls $$21.99

Tongs for Charcoal 5 3/4"

Pentagram $4.99
Triplemoon $4.99
Triquetra $4.99
Unadorned $3.99

Choose your Design